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AMT Day is May 24. Will there be a DMT Day?

Posted by on May 24, 2017

The FAA explores the future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, and the possible need for Drone Maintenance Technicians.

By Jul DeGeus

For obvious reasons, we at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance are highly anticipating the celebration of Aviation Maintenance Technician Day on May 24th.

On May 24th in 1868, Charles Edward Taylor was born on a farm in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. He would one day work on engines for the infamous Wright Brothers and become known as the first aviation maintenance technician. (1)

In the latest issue of the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Briefing, assistant editor Jennifer Caron transports you back to the early 1900’s, when the three “crazy” men attempted to make a solid object fly; something that is normal to us today. She then snaps us back into to the present with one genius question: “… you’re an AMT, watching in amazement as drones become increasingly popular. Are YOU the next Charlie Taylor — for drones?” (2)

She’s got a great point- what is the potential outlook for the UAS industry and UAS maintenance technicians? Caron explains the background, demand and the promising opportunities:

The job potential and growth is real, and most believe the UAS industry will grow exponentially. Just consider companies that look to use drones for package delivery. Theoretically, they will need thousands of UAS to meet delivery deadlines not only in the U.S., but around the world…The possibilities are vast. As more and more companies identify and create the need for UAS, the need for UAS technicians will flourish as well. (2)

AIM’s Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems training is a way for individuals to learn more about this evolving industry. It’s a two-day course offered at our Manassas, VA, Chesapeake VA, Atlanta – Metro GA, Dallas – Metro TX, Oakland CA, and Philadelphia PA campuses.

This article, “Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future?”, is a must read for those interested in UAS, as well as forward thinkers and innovators. Click here to read the article by Jennifer Caron, found on page 33.

Sources:

  1. Taylor, B. (n.d.). Charles E. Taylor: The Man Aviation History Almost Forgot. Retrieved from https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/phl/local_more/media/CT%20Hist.pdf
  2. Caron, J. (2017, May & June). Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future.FAA Safety Briefing, 33-34. doi:https://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2017/media/MayJun2017.pdf

AIM Announces UAS Program

Posted by on Sep 30, 2016

Prep for your Drone pilot Certification with Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training Courses

New UAS Certification Requirements Announced by FAA

Earlier this year, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced new regulations, via their Small Unmanned Aircraft Rule (Part 107), making it safer for businesses to operate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), by applying the FAA aircraft registration requirements. These new regulations went into effect in August 2016. Commercial drone pilots will now be required to pass the FAA Aeronautical Knowledge test.

The FAA reported, the UAS industry estimates the rule could generate more than $82 billion for the U.S. economy and create more than 100,000 new jobs over the next 10 years.

Preparing for Certification: UAS Training Courses Now Available

In response to the new testing requirements, the Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) has launched an Unmanned Aircraft System UAS training program for two of its locations; Chesapeake and Manassas, Virginia. The program consists of two separate two-day training courses, which are currently being offered on selected weekends. Individuals have the option of registering for a single course, or both courses together.

The first of these training courses serves as an introduction to unmanned aircraft systems and will teach students aerodynamic theory, principles of flight, flight restrictions, obstacle clearing, as well as the roles and responsibilities for unmanned aircraft systems.

The second of these courses provides a deeper operational understanding on unmanned aircraft systems, including unique flight properties and performance, calculating weight and balance, performing basic and advanced flight maneuvers and actions, and responses to common emergency scenarios.

These UAS training courses will prepare students to take the FAA UAS aeronautical knowledge test, or recurrent test for former military UAS operators, which would allow them to obtain their operator certificate from the FAA. Test fees are included in the cost of the training and can be taken right on campus. For more information on course dates, contact Brian Yeck (admdiramm@aviationmaintenance.edu) for Manassas training and Rosetta CiConta (admdiramn@aviationmaintenance.edu) for Chesapeake.