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Drones: Why You Need Your Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Even if You aren’t Pursuing an Aviation Degree

Posted by on Jul 11, 2017

Drones: Why You Need Your Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Even if You aren’t Pursuing an Aviation Degree

The FAA’s specific rules for flying a drone for recreational purposes are simple to follow. You only need to register your UAV and know a few other restrictions to be on the right side of the law. However, more UAV owners today are seeking training even when they have no intention to pursue an aviation degree in the future. Here are reasons why:

UAV Rules Coming into Effect

The FAA small unmanned aircraft system rule came into effect on August 2016. According to MacLean Insurance Company, more proposed rules are expected to become effective in a few months’ time.

However, the UAS training being offered by AIM won’t get outdated anytime soon. Your training at AIM will prepare you to be certified by the FAA and will comply with regulations. You’ll have the benefit of knowing you are certified to fly your drone under all the regulations likely to be enforced in the near future.

Insurers Demand

Planning to get an insurance cover for your drone? Don’t be surprised if your insurer asks for your training certificate. At the moment, many insurer companies are lenient about the level of training you have before accepting to cover your drone. However, in the future it’s more likely that you won’t find drone insurance without the necessary level of training.

Lack of Training Content

Only few drone manufacturers sell manuals and instructions that can help you learn how to fly the UAV safely. The rest lack detailed instructions and might not cover all operational questions you may have. You don’t have to rely on these manuals to fly your UAV, fortunately. You can learn how to assemble parts and take care of your drone in case of any problems from a good training course.

Business Opportunities are rising

According to Droneguru.net, it’s possible to build a career with your UAV. In the advertising industry, for example, there are opportunities for someone willing to invest their time with a drone. From simply flying banners with promotional messages in high traffic areas to taking photographs for developing adverts, there’s a future in drone advertising. Other popular industries where you can take your UAV aerial footage work are filmmaking, construction and farming.

Pursue an UAV course and gain skills that will help you fly and take care of your drone with little hassle.

How to Stay Hydrated on the Job

Posted by on Jun 27, 2017

Water is an extremely important component of the human body. Without it, our bodies don’t function properly. Yet at times, it’s difficult to keep the body hydrated throughout the day. Fortunately, it’s not impossible to create a routine that will keep your body hydrated during hot, humid days on the job:

#1 Drink Fluids Regularly

Source: Pixabay.

Did you know that you should drink at least 2 liters of water in a day? Yes, the best and only sure way to kill dehydration is to drink water regularly. To ensure you are conveniently hydrated throughout the day, don’t wait till you feel thirsty to drink water. According to statistics, you feel thirsty when you are already 2% dehydrated. Drink small amounts of water throughout the day to ensure hydration.

#2 Improve Your Personal Lifestyle Habits

Source: Pixabay.

Smoking and drinking alcohol before or during work hours can adversely dehydrate your body. Avoid drinks and foods that dehydrate the body; like foods that are high in sodium. Stick to eating well-balanced meals with food, like watermelon or cucumbers, that can hydrate your body during the day.

#3 Take Short Breaks      

Airport worker sitting in jet engine

If you are in a position where you can take short breaks in between your work, take them. A good ten-minute break lets you relax and take some deep breaths away from the exhausting heat at your work place. Breaks also encourage proper blood circulation in your body due to the added oxygen in the system. When it comes to performance, you’ve probably noticed that you work better when you feel relaxed. That means that taking breaks can improve your overall productivity at the end of the day.

#4 Eat More Fruits

Source: Pixabay.

How do you think an apple a day will keep you away from the doctor? For starters, it provides you with vitamins that protect you from regular attacks by diseases. But most importantly, the apple also contains juices that keep your body hydrated. It’s not just an apple that will you keep you hydrated however. Most fruits contain fluids and electrolytes that can keep your body hydrated. Eat a fruit every day and you will have fewer dehydration issues while you work.

No matter what kind of job you do, you want to feel healthy and at your very best as you do it. Sadly, there are moments when you just get a dry mouth, feel extremely thirsty and lose focus on your job. Luckily, with the tips above, you can stay hydrated and improve your productivity every day. Just remember that the tips above are not similar to a doctor’s expertise. For the best information on how to stay hydrated, consult your physician and visit your doctor if you feel abnormally dehydrated.

Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Posted by on Jun 21, 2017

By Max Murphy

Diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in 2010. With over 29 million Americans diagnosed according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention diabetes is becoming an increasingly urgent condition within the healthcare industry. The truth of the matter is, most people aren’t aware of how diabetes is formed in their bodies, so they don’t recognize the early onset symptoms.

So, what exactly causes diabetes?

Diabetes is caused by various factors, which include; genetics, exposure to various viruses, over-eating, malnutrition, blood glucose levels, your body’s autoimmune system, and generalized pancreas abuse. There are two forms of diabetes, type one; and type two. To understand how you can combat diabetes, you must first understand how each type of disease is affecting your body.

Type One:

Type one Diabetes is a chronic auto-immune disease in which your pancreas produces little to no insulin, which is a hormone that allows glucose (a sugar) to enter cells to produce energy for power. Type one is usually found within adolescents and makes its primary appearance in children. It has the potential to form later in life, but your body naturally becomes more resistant over time. Despite ongoing medical research, type one diabetes does not have a cure. Healthcare professionals can only prevent and manage the onset symptoms of this type of diabetes, so it doesn’t become a life threatening concern.

What causes it?

Medical scientists have been researching type one diabetes for over 2 decades, and have made a ton of progress in the evaluation, management, and prevention of such disease, but as of right now, the industry still does not exactly know how type one diabetes is formed in the body. The end result in type one is your body’s inability to maintain and regulate insulin producing cells within your pancreas due to certain responses within our body’s immune system. With this disease, your body’s immune system actually attacks the cells that create insulin within you.

Type Two:

Doctors can prevent and maintain type two diabetes in a number of ways. This type is most prevalent in adults, and you become more susceptible to symptoms as your body ages. However, within the last decade it has become an increasing problem in children, primarily due to obesity and lack of exercise.  Type two diabetes has most of the symptoms of type one, but instead of not being able to maintain insulin, in type two, your body actually becomes resistant to it.

How does insulin become resistant?

Scientific researchers propose that the resistance of insulin is caused by numerous factors, but the lead diagnosis is that it is centralized in a mal-nutritious diet, over consumption of mono-saturated fats, and incessant inactivity.

Do they have anything in common?

Type one and type two diabetes are not the same disease. Most people assume that to be true because they both are under the same umbrella. But the effects and causes of both of them are completely different.

Type one is primarily caused by a genetically derived autoimmune issues in which your body allows too much blood sugar into your system without having the necessary amount of insulin to break that sugar down into a manageable soluble carbohydrates that can be shifted into glucose and furthermore, into energy for your cells.

Type two on the other hand, is pioneered from multiple factors that primarily circulate around a lack of general exercise, weight, age, family history, and fat distribution. It can be easy for people to not realize the symptoms of type two diabetes because they are usually gradual and get incorporated into that individuals daily lifestyle choices.

Overview:

Diabetes has significantly risen within the last two decades. With this article’s knowledge you can be prepared to know what type of factors cultivate the symptoms and causes of diabetes, how each type affects your body, and the differences between them. With this new information you may find it easier to point out the onset symptoms, and hopefully this article will empower a lifestyle change surrounded by generalized well-being, physical exercise, and a healthy diet.

 

We want to hear from you!

Throughout this article, what fascinated you the most? Let us know in the comments!

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics/2014statisticsreport.html

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes-in-children/symptoms-causes/dxc-20311397

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861

http://www.everydayhealth.com/diabetes/difference-between-type-1-type-2-diabetes.aspx

http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/diabetes/overview.html

Open House, Open Questions: What to Ask When Attending an Open House

Posted by on Jun 13, 2017

Campus open houses are the time to experience how it feels to attend a certain college. It’s also the time to ask important questions since campus staff is available to assist you. While the amount of questions you could ask is endless, we’ve compiled questions you don’t want to forget to get the answers to when visiting an open house:

Admissions Questions

  • What is your process of admission?

This question helps you assess your chances of getting admitted into the college based on your qualification details.

  • What are your educational requirements?
  • What do I need to succeed while at this campus?

Get an idea of the personal principles and values you need to do well at the college. This question also helps you evaluate the general attitude of the campus towards education and non-academic issues.

Financial Questions

  • What is the total cost of my tuition?

This could be a broad question, so break it down into sections you consider most important to you. Ask about the tuition fees and the types of payment plans offered. And don’t stop there. Go on to read any financial guide the campus gives you to ensure that you are ready to handle all the financial obligations.

  • Are tools and books included in tuition?
  • Does the program you’re interested in require a uniform? If so, is it included in tuition?
  • Are there any scholarship programs available?
  • Do you have financial aid programs for your students?

Most schools do and it’s important that you find out so you have the opportunity to access a form of extra financial support.

Questions about the Campus Environment

  • What is the overall campus environment like?

Learn the “vibe” of the campus and it surrounding facilities to make sure that it is an environment that you can adapt to and will be comfortable in for a long period of time.

  • What kind of social activities does your campus participate in?

Find out what types of events are held at the campus, if any. This could be a way for you to meet new friends and also network to find a connection for your career down the line.

Adult Learners- Support Questions

With more responsibility comes more questions. You may be presented with a different set of obstacles that require you to seek out additional support to make your education possible.

  • Do you aid in job placement assistance?
  • What counseling and guidance services do you offer to students? Are these services accessible?
  • Is tutoring available?
  • Is there a Student Center?
  • Do you offer child care or have services nearby?
  • Transportation is key. Do you have a ride share program or provide transportation services for students who don’t have a vehicle?
  • What can career services help me with?

Be sure you ask the questions that are most important to you when attending an open house. Make the most out of this opportunity to get the information you need to help decide if the institution is right for you!

Airport Codes Quiz Part 1

Posted by on Jun 6, 2017

Every airport in the world has a specific three-digit code, or the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Location Identifier Code. Originally, airports were identified by the same two-letter code that National Weather Service used to recognize the city it was in. As the amount of airports increased, a third letter was added to establish specific airports easier. In this quiz, see how many of these codes you can decipher:


 

Alabama- Montgomery Regional Airport

Alaska- Fairbanks International Airport

Arizona- Yuma International Airport

Arkansas- Clinton National Airport

California- Fresno Yosemite International Airport

Colorado- Grand Junction Regional Airport

Connecticut- Bradley International Airport

District of Columbia- Washington Dulles International Airport

Florida- Daytona Beach International Airport

Georgia- Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport

Hawaii- Kahului Airport

Idaho- Boise Airport

Illinois- Quad City International Airport

Indiana- South Bend International Airport

Iowa- The Eastern Iowa Airport

Kansas- Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport

Kentucky- Blue Grass Airport

Louisiana- Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport

Maine- Bangor International Airport

Maryland- Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport

Massachusetts- Logan International Airport

Michigan- Kalamazoo-Battle Creek International Airport

Minnesota- Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport

Mississippi- Jackson–Medgar Wiley Evers International Airport

Missouri- Kansas City International Airport