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FAA Career Training

AMT Day is May 24. Will there be a DMT Day?

Posted by on May 24, 2017

The FAA explores the future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, and the possible need for Drone Maintenance Technicians.

By Jul DeGeus

For obvious reasons, we at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance are highly anticipating the celebration of Aviation Maintenance Technician Day on May 24th.

On May 24th in 1868, Charles Edward Taylor was born on a farm in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. He would one day work on engines for the infamous Wright Brothers and become known as the first aviation maintenance technician. (1)

In the latest issue of the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Briefing, assistant editor Jennifer Caron transports you back to the early 1900’s, when the three “crazy” men attempted to make a solid object fly; something that is normal to us today. She then snaps us back into to the present with one genius question: “… you’re an AMT, watching in amazement as drones become increasingly popular. Are YOU the next Charlie Taylor — for drones?” (2)

She’s got a great point- what is the potential outlook for the UAS industry and UAS maintenance technicians? Caron explains the background, demand and the promising opportunities:

The job potential and growth is real, and most believe the UAS industry will grow exponentially. Just consider companies that look to use drones for package delivery. Theoretically, they will need thousands of UAS to meet delivery deadlines not only in the U.S., but around the world…The possibilities are vast. As more and more companies identify and create the need for UAS, the need for UAS technicians will flourish as well. (2)

AIM’s Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems training is a way for individuals to learn more about this evolving industry. It’s a two-day course offered at our Manassas, VA, Chesapeake VA, Atlanta – Metro GA, Dallas – Metro TX, Oakland CA, and Philadelphia PA campuses.

This article, “Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future?”, is a must read for those interested in UAS, as well as forward thinkers and innovators. Click here to read the article by Jennifer Caron, found on page 33.

Sources:

  1. Taylor, B. (n.d.). Charles E. Taylor: The Man Aviation History Almost Forgot. Retrieved from https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/phl/local_more/media/CT%20Hist.pdf
  2. Caron, J. (2017, May & June). Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future.FAA Safety Briefing, 33-34. doi:https://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2017/media/MayJun2017.pdf

Aviation Maintenance School Offering Summer Camp to Aspiring Mechanics

Posted by on May 23, 2017

Aviation Maintenance School Offering Summer Camp to Aspiring Mechanics

Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Jet Tech Summer Camp will provide participants a preview into the school’s FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician program.

By Brian Stauss

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) will be offering a glimpse into the world of aircraft maintenance through its annual Jet Tech Summer Aviation Maintenance Camp at select campuses.

Camp participants will spend time in AIM’s hangars, classrooms, and labs, learning about the basics of aviation maintenance. Topics covered will include aircraft systems and powerplants, ground operations, safety wiring, physics of flight, and much more. This is the perfect opportunity for individuals who are interested in working with their hands. The camp will also provide a preview of the skills aviation maintenance technicians perform after obtaining their certification.

Camp dates and locations are as follows:

 

Atlanta metro – June 23; 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Houston – June 26 – 30 or July 31 – Aug. 4; 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily

Indianapolis – June 19 – 23; 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Kansas City – June 16 or July 7; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Philadelphia – July 31; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

“Here at AIM, we strive to educate today’s youth about the important field of aviation maintenance,” says Ben Sitton, Campus Executive Director at AIM’s Atlanta metro campus. “Our Jet Tech Summer Camp is an excellent opportunity to do just that…to expose young boys and girls to a potential career path that otherwise may not have ever crossed their minds.”

AIM’s Jet Tech Summer Camp is open to upcoming high school graduates and rising high school seniors. Individuals interested in enrolling into the camp should contact the appropriate campus.

 

Atlanta metro – (678) 377-5600

Houston – (713) 644-7777

Indianapolis – (317) 243-4519

Kansas City – (816) 753-9920

Philadelphia – (215) 676-7700

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

Aviation Institute of Maintenance Campuses Selected to Partner with Delta Air Lines

Posted by on May 18, 2017

A number of Aviation Institute of Maintenance campuses have been selected for a partnership with Delta Air Lines. With this partnership, the campuses gain an industry resource in their efforts to train students in their quest to become FAA certified aviation maintenance technicians.

By Brian Stauss

A number of Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s (AIM) campuses have been selected by Delta Air Lines for a partnership in an effort to prepare for the hiring needs brought about by the forecasted demand for qualified aircraft maintenance technicians.

Over the last few months, Delta TechOps, the maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) division of Delta Airlines, has been evaluating aviation maintenance schools, searching for institutions that demonstrate a commitment to meeting Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards as well as Delta’s high principles that exceed these industry standards.

Selected for these partnerships include AIM campuses located in the metro areas of Atlanta, GA, Dallas, TX and Washington D.C, along with campuses in Las Vegas, NV and Chesapeake, VA.

“This partnership is an incredible opportunity for our students and graduates that will allow us continuous improvement of our Aviation Maintenance Technician program by partnering with one of the premier leaders in the aviation industry,” says Ben Sitton, Executive Director at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Atlanta metro campus. “Delta Air Lines recognizes the high demand of the Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT) position and we are honored to be a resource to assist them in attaining the industry’s best and brightest AMTs.”

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

AIM Houston Hawks Take the World by Storm

Posted by on May 17, 2017

By: Jennifer Butler Edited by: Jul DeGeus & James Clary

It’s no surprise that the Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) Houston Campus Skills Team would represent AIM in a dynamic event celebrating Aviation Maintenance Technicians. The AIM Houston Hawks are comprised of a vibrant group of students that are driven, dedicated, and passionate about aviation maintenance. They have proven themselves individually; each member excels in a particular set of skills. But the unique dynamic that sets Hawks apart from other teams is their ability to recognize each other’s strengths and use those strengths to the teams overall advantage.

(Left to right) Coach Mike Riccardelli, Cordero Garcia, Brandon Daniel, Vijay Parsan, Fernando Viertons & Joshua Borel at AMC.

This team is comprised of seven students; seven students with a strong work ethic. Seven students who are organized and know how to set and accomplish goals. Seven future Aviation Maintenance Technicians that take pride in the career for which they are training for. Seven students who will one day become as valuable employees as they are students. When combined, they are an unstoppable team. They are AIM Houston’s epitome of success. They are the AIM Houston Hawks, 2017 Skills Team; Joshua Borel (Team Captain), Fernando Viertons, Vijay Parsan, Brandon Daniel, Cordero Garcia, Roberto Moreira (Alternate) and Christa Isenhower (Alternate).

 

When AIM Houston announced the need for the skills team, there were an overwhelming amount of students interested. To recruit those who were most qualified, the school held a competition. Brandon Daniel, one of the talented students who won a spot on the team, recollects, “What a spectacular and life changing experience! Although the 2017 AIM Houston Hawks Skills Team’s journey was truly amazing, it was not easy. We competed against each other for a spot on the team.”

 
Once assembled, the Hawks worked together to develop their talents as a team and as individuals. Focused with their eyes on the prize, they had one goal in mind: Prepare for and place at the Professional Aviation Maintenance Association (PAMA) Southwest Regional Olympics held in Ft. Worth, Texas. Team Captain, Josh Borell, set the standard for his team. “All of us went in with a job to do: bring home the gold.”

Joshua Borel (left) & Vijay Parsan at AMC.

The PAMA Southwest Regional Olympics introduced the AIM Houston Hawks to new challengers: AIM Dallas, Texas State Technical College, TULSA Tech, Tarrant Community College and Letourneau University. Many of the competing teams had worked together for several years and were veterans of the competition. Some of the teams even had multiple victories under their belts from a previous year at the PAMA Olympics. But this year was different; this year an aviation school from Houston, Texas stepped up to the plate and challenged the winning streak of Tarrant County Community College and Letourneau University. The results were in and AIM Houston Instructor and AIM Houston Hawks Coach, Mike Riccardelli, was elated with his team’s success:

 
The Hawks took 1st place individual, 3rd place individual, 1st place Overall Team and 2nd place for Operation C.H.A.O.S. This is a first for PAMA Southwest Regional Olympics. The Houston Campus Instructors were very instrumental in prepping this team and it takes an awesome team to become a winning team. This was a win for all of AIM!

 
It was a “welcome home” worthy of heroes as the Aviation Institute of Maintenance Houston Skills Team returned to their campus the Monday morning after the PAMA Olympics. Collecting 4 awards, including 1st place individual and 1st place overall, the team was met with a path of adoring students and spirited faculty, whose cheers of support and pride echoed throughout the hangar.

 

“After months of practice, blood, sweat, and tears we completed our job. We proved that making deadlines, hard work, and dedication pays off,“ said Borel. Not only did AIM Houston show what commitment and team work look like, they reminded competitors not to underestimate passion and devotion as a motivator for success.

 
After the thrill and excitement upon their return hushed in the hangar, the Hawks has a message for their campus, as well as their sister schools. This honor wasn’t just theirs; they graciously dedicated this win to all AIM students and instructors. “Our team has the skills and motivation, but what sets them apart is their passion for aviation maintenance and their passion for success,” Aaron Armendariz, Campus Executive Director of AIM Houston, articulated with pride.

 
But the Hawk’s journey didn’t stop there.

(Left to right) Vijay Parson, Brandon Daniel, Joshua Borel & Fernando Viertons at AMC.

Shortly after the win at PAMA, Armendariz received a call with an invitation for the team to attend the Aerospace Maintenance Competition (AMC) held in Orlando, Florida the week of April 24-27, 2017. Only this time, they were no longer the AIM Houston Skills Team. Representing all of AIM, the Hawks title graduated to the Aviation Institute of Maintenance Skills Team.

 
The date of the competition had finally arrived and, though the team was in Orlando, AIM Houston was steadfast with support. Time stood still as the entirety of students and staff gathered to anxiously watch the live feed of the AMC.

 
Questions plagued the campus community: Would they win? How would they do overall? What if they didn’t place? But regardless of the outcome, one thing the campus knew for sure was that the skills team would represent AIM with pride and give their all to succeed. Each day that passed students and staff could see the successfulness of the team; they knew this would be a close race and that the AIM skills team was one of the top contenders.

 
And then, the moment the campus and Skills team had been waiting for came: The announcement of the winners.

 
The room was silent as the AMC MC announced second place, overall. It was AIM! Second among all 22 schools that were competing, seventh of 56 teams competing and number one in the Schools Category for the Geared Turbo-Fan Engine Event. Hawk, Vijay Parsan, reminisces, “I enjoyed performing all the events as I knew in my heart that I was on the right path on building my future. Winning the cup, however, showed and proved to me that hard work and determination pays off immensely.”

(Left to right) Cordero Garcia, Fernando Viertons, Vijay Parsan, Joshua Borel & Brandon Daniel at AMC.

The Hawks triumph could not have been attained without the help of their coach, Mike Riccardelli, as well as countless faculty such as Brian Thompson, who rigorously helped prepare them for the different skills required for their success. “Being around the team is a reminder of “You get out of it, what you put into it.” They have their own bar, their own standard. And it is set very high,” Thompson boosts about the group.

 
As winners of the event, the AIM Houston Hawks received Pratt & Whitney scholarships totaling $16,000, Mechanix Certificates totaling $600 as well as Snap-On/Grypshon and Mechanix Wear for $800 of tools and equipment per team member. Team member Christa Isenhower left the event with the future on her mind: “This is an experience I will never forget and is a great start to a new career.”

Cordero Garcia (left) & Fernando Viertons at AMC.

The AMC competition was the experience of a lifetime for the AIM Houston Hawks. Roberto Moreira, Fernando Viertons and Cordero Garcia put into words the experience of the competition and their admiration of their team:

 
It has been both an honor and a blessing to be a part of the AIM Houston Maintenance Skills Team. I am so proud of each and every accomplishment the Hawks have achieved. From winning first place in the PAMA Olympics to having the second lowest time among schools at AMC, the team has really worked hard to get to this point. To see the amount of time, dedication and teamwork the guys had while they practiced was a sight to see. -Roberto Moreira

 
One of the things I learned in this amazing experience is that no matter the obstacles, be level minded, follow procedures and have fun. GO HAWKS! -Fernando Viertons

 
It was a wonderful opportunity to see all of the new technology and equipment being used in the field right now, as well as, being able to compete with some of the best in the profession. I look forward to going back and winning next year. -Cordero Garcia

 
This is a win for all the students who want to finish school and earn their certification. This is a win for all the individuals who need to be reminded that staying true to yourself and remaining loyal to something important truly pays off in the end.

 
AIM Houston is proud of this gifted group of individuals and we look forward to witnessing all their future success. Soar high, Hawks. You did it!

The Sikorsky Kraftsman

Posted by on May 16, 2017

 A Spotlight on AIM Atlanta’s Day Coordinator, Christopher Kraft.

By Diana Hammond, Edited by Jul DeGeus

Christopher Kraft is the Day Coordinator at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance located in the Atlanta Metro area of Georgia. He started his career with AIM over ten years ago and since has become a prominent and supportive figure on campus. From supervising, hiring and training instructors to ensuring compliance with the FAA, Kraft is vital to making sure the operation of the AMT program runs smoothly. Like so many, Kraft has a colorful and exciting past that most are unfamiliar with. A life woven with tales of aviation, adventure and his passion for history, Kraft was fortunate enough to find himself involved in some historic events.

From a young age, Kraft knew he wanted to work in aviation. At age 18, he enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard and worked hard as a “deckie” for three years until he was able to train and become an aircraft specialist. The first helicopter flight that Mr. Kraft ever took was in a Sikorsky HH-52A, while stationed in Port Huron, Michigan. Little did he know how big of an impact this would have on his life. Kraft instantaneously became entranced with helicopters and the way the aircraft could perform life-saving auto rotations during that first ride.  After he finished his training in Port Huron, Kraft was stationed at the Detroit Coast Guard Station. The Detroit unit was the last unit in the Coast Guard with active Sikorsky HH-52As in their fleet.  Kraft held the position of crew chief, or flight mechanic, for the unit that covered an area of over 400 miles from Saginaw, Michigan to Buffalo, New York.

Kraft (far right) pictured with friends after his first helicopter flight.

Throughout the late 1980s, the Sikorsky HH-52As began to be decommissioned, dwindling their numbers. In 1989, the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum contracted the Coast Guard with requests to fly a Sikorsky HH-52A from Elizabeth City, North Carolina to preserve the aircraft in the museum’s collection. Based off of Kraft’s intimate experience and extensive knowledge of the helicopter, he was chosen to be part of the groundbreaking maintenance and delivery mission.

A few years later, Kraft was transferred from the Detroit Coast Guard Base to the Brooklyn Coast Guard Air Station at Floyd Bennett Field. The Brooklyn Coast Guard Air Station was, at the time, the oldest working search and rescue unit in the world. While with the Brooklyn Coast Guard Unit, Kraft delivered yet another Sikorsky HH-52A to an infamous museum; this time, he performed the maintenance and delivery of a Sikorsky HH-52A to the USS Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum Complex on the Hudson River.

In 1994, the Brooklyn Coast Guard Air Station was decommissioned and Kraft, along with his crew, found an original rescue hoist designed by Igor Sikorsky, the founder of Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and pioneer in helicopter design and manufacturing. (1)Additionally, they found a guestbook that had been signed by historic figures including Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe, to name a few. These two items were sent to find a home, alongside the Sikorsky HH-52A at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum collection. To the public, the Sikorsky HH-52A helicopter, the rescue hoist, and the memorabilia at the Smithsonian are historical artifacts, to be gazed upon, read about and passed by. But to Kraft these were, and will always be, pieces of living history that defined significant moments in his life.

Kraft is a veteran of many search and rescue missions that were performed on Sikorsky HH-52As. The Sikorsky HH-52As are credited with saving over 40,000 lives while in commission. “As far as maintenance goes, it would take up to eight hours of maintenance to fix a helicopter that had landed in the water. After rescuing a person, and delivering them home safely, my mission was to take care of the Sikorsky that made it all possible,” Kraft reminisces. 

Helicopters have become one of the most indispensable aircrafts in the world, with their efficiency in performing life-saving tasks. Christopher Kraft, of the Aviation Institute of Maintenance, is a fine example of someone who has fulfilled the dream of Igor Sikorsky in helicopter rescue and maintenance. Thank you, Mr. Kraft, for passing on your legacy and passion to our students at AIM Atlanta on a daily basis.

 

Source:

1Recognizing Igor I. Sikorsky, a National Aviation Pioneer, H. RES. 331, 108th Cong. (2003-2004).

 

https://www.congress.gov/bill/108th-congress/house-resolution/331/text