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FAA Career Training

Aviation Maintenance School to Showcase Drone Training Program for Local High Schoolers

Posted by on Oct 25, 2017

Course exposes students to key aspects of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) industry with a focus on drone pilot training. This course is designed to help students obtain their operator certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration.

By Brian Stauss

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is now offering unmanned aerial systems (drone) training for individuals in the Charlotte, NC metro area. This comes as a response to the Part 107 regulations set forth by the FAA in regards to commercial use of unmanned aircraft and the growth of aerospace innovation within the Charlotte metro area.

AIM began offering this training to local students at Olympic High School on October 11th. Courses will continue through November 11th. The program teaches students the history of unmanned aircraft, their various uses, the development of governmental regulations relating to drone use, and explores future opportunities in this growing field of aviation.

“We offer the drone pilot course within the local communities of all 11 of our campuses around the country, and we make it a practice to offer free training opportunities to high school students within the communities we serve,” states Vice President of Operations for AIM, Dr. Joel English.  “We plan to bring our newest and most advanced AIM campus to the Charlotte area in 2018, and we feel that partnering with Olympic High School to provide its students with training and FAA certification is a meaningful entry into the Charlotte community.”

Specific topics covered in the drone course include airspace classifications, operating requirements, and various flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation. Additional areas of learning include: the effects of weather on drone performance, aircraft loading, emergency procedures, radio communication procedures, drone maintenance and preflight inspection procedures, and more.

As a part of the program, AIM has signed a licensing agreement with Little Arms Ltd. for the use of their Zephyr drone flight simulator software.

The drone program culminates with a Fly Day event, to be held at Olympic High School from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is open to the public and will showcase the skills the students acquired during their training, highlighted by actual drone flight displays.

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s UAS training prepares students to take the FAA Unmanned Aircraft General (UAG) pilot exam, which is required to obtain their FAA 107 operator certificate.

“Learning how to operate unmanned aircraft systems and receiving the FAA 107 certificate places our students on the leading edge of the future of aviation,” says Michael Sasso, Director of Education at Aviation Institute of Maintenance. “This affords students the opportunity to fill the upcoming demand for drone pilots”.

For information about additional course dates, contact Michael Sasso at directoredamc@aviationmaintenance.edu or call (651) 494-4908.

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

Drone Industry Outlook

Posted by on Sep 26, 2017

The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) states, “the drones are coming.” And with them, they are going to bring jobs as well as an economic impact due to the changes in the drone industry, especially with the introduction of part 107 by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Drone Industry Growth

Business Insider defines drones as “aerial vehicles that can fly autonomously or be piloted by a remote individual.” Using this definition, they expect:

  • Sales to go past $12 billion in 2021,a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.6% from 2016’s $8.5 billion
  • Consumer drones alone to hit 29 million in 2021, a CAGR of 31.3%
  • 805,000 in 2021 enterprise drones, a CAGR of 51% from 2016’s 102,600

The military drone market is mature with the Department of Defense (DOD) looking to increase its more than 7,000 drones in 2012 by 50 more at an estimated cost of $2.9 billion.

Estimated Economic Impact

The FAA 2015 prediction deadline for integrating drones into the national civilian airspace forecasted:

  • $82.1 billion in economic impact by 2025
  • 100,000 jobs by 2025

Who Will Buy Drones?

In a report by Markets and Markets, North America leads the forecast by 45% as the dominant regional market. Domestically in the US, agricultural drone applications will dwarf all others accounting for $75.6 billion of the total economic impact by 2025, according to AUVSI. Government facilities follow up by $3.2 billion while all other sectors combed will take up $3.2 billion of the economic impact.

Based on application: Aerial photography and remote sensing is expected to lead.

Based on duration of service: Short duration service is expected to lead.

Drone Economy Among States

AUVSI observes that the drone economy will not be spread in an even manner. The domestic drone boom will hugely benefit:

  • California*
  • Washington
  • Texas*
  • Florida*
  • Arizona

Other states that will still benefit albeit in a small manner are:

  • Oklahoma
  • Indiana*
  • Ohio

*These states are home to AIM: San Francisco Bay, California – Metro, Houston, Texas, Dallas, Texas – Metro, Orlando, Florida – Metro and Indianapolis, Indiana.

Small Model Hobbyists Drone Growth Prediction

The FAA predicts the hobbyists’ fleet to more than triple in size from 1.1 million vehicles in 2016 to more than 3.5 million in 2021. This represents a CAGR of 26.4%.

The drone industry is expected to grow. Take Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems course to become a part of this industry. This course is offered at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance – Manassas VAChesapeake VAAtlanta – Metro GAOakland Metro CA, Dallas –Metro TX, Houston TX, Kansas City MO, Philadelphia PA, and Las Vegas NV campuses.

Job Opportunities for Drone Operators

Posted by on Aug 8, 2017

By Esperanza Poquiz & Jul DeGeus

When Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or drones, were first introduced, they were commonly known as expensive toys that were used to race and fly for enjoyment. Agile and small enough to fit into tight spaces, operators quickly realized they could explore alternate ways to use drones to their advantage. And so, drones were quickly integrated into the workforce, providing assistance and efficiency to select industries. Here are a few:

  • Photography –Using drones, photographers are able to get aerial photographs. This is an advantage as it allows the photographer to capture an image without disrupting the moment. These sky-high snapshots are a great way for beginners to set their portfolio apart from the rest. Whether it’s shooting for weddings, corporate events or just artistic curiosity, drone photography has become a popular request. Even real estate agencies look to drone operator photographers to shoot from above ground and to get a 360° view their properties.

  • Company Inspections and Surveillance – A variety of different types of properties require maintenance and inspections on a on a daily basis. There are facilities that prove to be too dangerous to inspect manually, so instead of having an inspector assess the property, companies enlist the aid of drones to access the area. Additionally, drones enable companies, like wind farms or constructions sites, to survey the land for design.
  • Films- Always wanted to be a part of filming a big blockbuster hit? Cinematography, like parts featured in movies such as Skyfall, Jurassic World and Captain America: Civil War, sometimes require shots to be filmed by drones. If Hollywood is not your scene but you still have a passions for filming, videographers use drones to capture events like weddings, documentaries and commercials.
  • First Responders – Drones are supporting our community heroes by feeding rescuers live video streams that allow them to assess situations to come up with the safest plan before going into a hostile environment. First responders use drone operators to help locate people who are missing in an area that is too large to cover by foot, while fire fighters and police assign drones with the task of detecting people in danger and finding the safest path in life-threatening situations.
  • Deliveries-Large companies, like Walmart, Amazon and Google, are testing out idea of using drone operators for delivery services. This feature could hasten the delivery process of online orders. Instead of waiting days for a package to arrive, the consumer could receive the package in hours.

  • Drone Racing- What once started as a casual pastime, drone racing has become a popular tech sport. Drone operating teams enter competitions for cash prizes and companies have given the winners of these matches sponsorships and contracts to continue racing for money.

If this has sparked your interest check out our Unmanned Aircraft Systems course to help you get started towards your career!

Drones: Why You Need Your Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Even if You aren’t Pursuing an Aviation Degree

Posted by on Jul 11, 2017

Drones: Why You Need Your Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Even if You aren’t Pursuing an Aviation Degree

The FAA’s specific rules for flying a drone for recreational purposes are simple to follow. You only need to register your UAV and know a few other restrictions to be on the right side of the law. However, more UAV owners today are seeking training even when they have no intention to pursue an aviation degree in the future. Here are reasons why:

UAV Rules Coming into Effect

The FAA small unmanned aircraft system rule came into effect on August 2016. According to MacLean Insurance Company, more proposed rules are expected to become effective in a few months’ time.

However, the UAS training being offered by AIM won’t get outdated anytime soon. Your training at AIM will prepare you to be certified by the FAA and will comply with regulations. You’ll have the benefit of knowing you are certified to fly your drone under all the regulations likely to be enforced in the near future.

Insurers Demand

Planning to get an insurance cover for your drone? Don’t be surprised if your insurer asks for your training certificate. At the moment, many insurer companies are lenient about the level of training you have before accepting to cover your drone. However, in the future it’s more likely that you won’t find drone insurance without the necessary level of training.

Lack of Training Content

Only few drone manufacturers sell manuals and instructions that can help you learn how to fly the UAV safely. The rest lack detailed instructions and might not cover all operational questions you may have. You don’t have to rely on these manuals to fly your UAV, fortunately. You can learn how to assemble parts and take care of your drone in case of any problems from a good training course.

Business Opportunities are rising

According to Droneguru.net, it’s possible to build a career with your UAV. In the advertising industry, for example, there are opportunities for someone willing to invest their time with a drone. From simply flying banners with promotional messages in high traffic areas to taking photographs for developing adverts, there’s a future in drone advertising. Other popular industries where you can take your UAV aerial footage work are filmmaking, construction and farming.

Pursue an UAV course and gain skills that will help you fly and take care of your drone with little hassle.

AMT Day is May 24. Will there be a DMT Day?

Posted by on May 24, 2017

The FAA explores the future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, and the possible need for Drone Maintenance Technicians.

By Jul DeGeus

For obvious reasons, we at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance are highly anticipating the celebration of Aviation Maintenance Technician Day on May 24th.

On May 24th in 1868, Charles Edward Taylor was born on a farm in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. He would one day work on engines for the infamous Wright Brothers and become known as the first aviation maintenance technician. (1)

In the latest issue of the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Briefing, assistant editor Jennifer Caron transports you back to the early 1900’s, when the three “crazy” men attempted to make a solid object fly; something that is normal to us today. She then snaps us back into to the present with one genius question: “… you’re an AMT, watching in amazement as drones become increasingly popular. Are YOU the next Charlie Taylor — for drones?” (2)

She’s got a great point- what is the potential outlook for the UAS industry and UAS maintenance technicians? Caron explains the background, demand and the promising opportunities:

The job potential and growth is real, and most believe the UAS industry will grow exponentially. Just consider companies that look to use drones for package delivery. Theoretically, they will need thousands of UAS to meet delivery deadlines not only in the U.S., but around the world…The possibilities are vast. As more and more companies identify and create the need for UAS, the need for UAS technicians will flourish as well. (2)

AIM’s Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems training is a way for individuals to learn more about this evolving industry. It’s a two-day course offered at our Manassas, VA, Chesapeake VA, Atlanta – Metro GA, Dallas – Metro TX, Oakland CA, and Philadelphia PA campuses.

This article, “Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future?”, is a must read for those interested in UAS, as well as forward thinkers and innovators. Click here to read the article by Jennifer Caron, found on page 33.

Sources:

  1. Taylor, B. (n.d.). Charles E. Taylor: The Man Aviation History Almost Forgot. Retrieved from https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/phl/local_more/media/CT%20Hist.pdf
  2. Caron, J. (2017, May & June). Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future.FAA Safety Briefing, 33-34. doi:https://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2017/media/MayJun2017.pdf

We Don’t Want to “Drone” On, But Unmanned Aircraft Training is Now Offered at AIM Dallas

Posted by on May 3, 2017

We Don’t Want to “Drone” On, But Unmanned Aircraft Training is Now Offered at AIM Dallas

Training will expose students to key aspects of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems field, with a focus on new federal regulations and operating procedures. These courses are designed to help students obtain their remote pilot certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration.

By Brian Stauss

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) announced it will now be offering Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) training at its campus located in Irving, Texas. This training course was created in response to the growing regulations set forth by the FAA in regards to commercial use of Unmanned Aircraft.

“Our UAS training course is another exciting point of service provided to support the FAA’s aviation safety initiatives designed to educate those who appreciate the creative career opportunities in an evolving field of Unmanned Aircraft Systems,” says David Meierotto, Executive Campus Director at the Irving campus. “The Aviation Institute of Maintenance has a proud history of supporting innovation in aviation maintenance and our new UAS training is yet another chapter added towards that standing.”

This training consists of a pair of two-day courses, each being offered on designated weekends only.  Individuals have the option of either enrolling in one of the courses, or they can enroll in both (this would require two separate weekends to complete the second course). The goal of the first course will be to teach students the history of unmanned aircraft, their various missions, the development of drone regulations, and to explore future opportunities in this growing field of aviation. The second course provides an operational understanding on unmanned aircraft, focusing more on actual drone piloting.  Topics covered in this course will include unique flight properties and performance, performing basic and advanced flight maneuvers, and responses to common emergency scenarios.

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s UAS training will prepare students to take the FAA UAS aeronautical test, or recurrent test for former military UAS operators, which would allow them to obtain their remote pilot certificate from the FAA. Test fees are included in the cost of the training.

For more information on enrolling into Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s UAS training course, contact AIM’s Dallas campus at (214) 333-9711.

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance is the United States’ largest family of aviation maintenance schools, with headquarters in Virginia Beach, Va. Students learn the skills necessary to become successful in one of the world’s fastest growing industries, aviation maintenance and the free Human Factors course and certification are examples of the school’s passion and commitment to the aviation industry. AIM graduates are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.