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Quick History: The Background of the Fourth of July

Posted by on Jul 4, 2017

The United States celebrates Independence Day every July 4th as the nation’s birthday. The holiday more accurately represents the date in 1776 when the 13 “United Colonies” declared freedom from the British Empire by adopting the Declaration of Independence. The colonists went on to defeat Great Britain in the Revolutionary War, which led to the formation of a new independent nation. Here are some important facts on 4th of July history.

Source: Library of Congress.

Early American Timeline

  • May 15, 1776 – Virginia Convention approves a resolution to declare independence
  • June 7, 1776 – The Resolution of Independence, also known as the Lee Resolution, is proposed by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia
  • June 11, 1776 – Colonists meet in Philadelphia for the Second Continental Congress to draft the Declaration of Independence
  • July 2, 1776 – The Continental Congress votes for independence
  • July 4, 1776 – The Continental Congress adopts the final version of the Declaration after changes are made to Thomas Jefferson’s original draft
  • July 8, 1776 – Ringing of bells at Independence Square in Philadelphia marks the first public readings of the Declaration
  • August 2, 1776 – Final signatures of the Declaration are completed
  • November 15, 1777 – Congress ratifies the Articles of Confederation
  • March 1, 1781 – Final ratification of Articles of Confederation by all states

Toward a New Nation

The writers of the Declaration were known as the “Committee of Five,” which, besides Jefferson, included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston. The Declaration of Independence included a list of grievances that the colonies had toward Britain. One of the main complaints was taxation without representation.

The American Revolutionary War began in 1775 and France began aiding Americans in 1777. Other American allies included Spain and the Dutch Republic. The war lasted on American soil through 1781. The naval battle ended on September 3, 1783, when King George III of Britain signed the Treaty of Paris.

The United States finalized the Constitution on September 8, 1787. In 1789, George Washington was elected the nation’s first president. By 1790, all 13 states had ratified the Constitution. Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, both died on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence in 1826. Another Founding Father, James Monroe, died on July 4, 1831.

Holiday History

Philadelphia celebrated Independence Day on July 4, 1777. After that, the celebrations spread from town to town every July 4th, but it wasn’t until after 1812 that it became widespread. It wasn’t until 1870 when Congress established July 4th as an official national holiday, called “Independence Day.” Congress then reaffirmed it as a paid holiday for federal workers in 1938.

Celebrations often include fireworks and outdoor music events. “The Star-Spangled Banner” became the national anthem in 1931, although the lyrics were written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key and the melody was based on an earlier British song called “Anacreon in Heaven” by John Stafford Smith. Another popular song associated with 4th of July history is “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” written in 1896 by John Philip Sousa.

Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Posted by on Jun 21, 2017

By Max Murphy

Diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in 2010. With over 29 million Americans diagnosed according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention diabetes is becoming an increasingly urgent condition within the healthcare industry. The truth of the matter is, most people aren’t aware of how diabetes is formed in their bodies, so they don’t recognize the early onset symptoms.

So, what exactly causes diabetes?

Diabetes is caused by various factors, which include; genetics, exposure to various viruses, over-eating, malnutrition, blood glucose levels, your body’s autoimmune system, and generalized pancreas abuse. There are two forms of diabetes, type one; and type two. To understand how you can combat diabetes, you must first understand how each type of disease is affecting your body.

Type One:

Type one Diabetes is a chronic auto-immune disease in which your pancreas produces little to no insulin, which is a hormone that allows glucose (a sugar) to enter cells to produce energy for power. Type one is usually found within adolescents and makes its primary appearance in children. It has the potential to form later in life, but your body naturally becomes more resistant over time. Despite ongoing medical research, type one diabetes does not have a cure. Healthcare professionals can only prevent and manage the onset symptoms of this type of diabetes, so it doesn’t become a life threatening concern.

What causes it?

Medical scientists have been researching type one diabetes for over 2 decades, and have made a ton of progress in the evaluation, management, and prevention of such disease, but as of right now, the industry still does not exactly know how type one diabetes is formed in the body. The end result in type one is your body’s inability to maintain and regulate insulin producing cells within your pancreas due to certain responses within our body’s immune system. With this disease, your body’s immune system actually attacks the cells that create insulin within you.

Type Two:

Doctors can prevent and maintain type two diabetes in a number of ways. This type is most prevalent in adults, and you become more susceptible to symptoms as your body ages. However, within the last decade it has become an increasing problem in children, primarily due to obesity and lack of exercise.  Type two diabetes has most of the symptoms of type one, but instead of not being able to maintain insulin, in type two, your body actually becomes resistant to it.

How does insulin become resistant?

Scientific researchers propose that the resistance of insulin is caused by numerous factors, but the lead diagnosis is that it is centralized in a mal-nutritious diet, over consumption of mono-saturated fats, and incessant inactivity.

Do they have anything in common?

Type one and type two diabetes are not the same disease. Most people assume that to be true because they both are under the same umbrella. But the effects and causes of both of them are completely different.

Type one is primarily caused by a genetically derived autoimmune issues in which your body allows too much blood sugar into your system without having the necessary amount of insulin to break that sugar down into a manageable soluble carbohydrates that can be shifted into glucose and furthermore, into energy for your cells.

Type two on the other hand, is pioneered from multiple factors that primarily circulate around a lack of general exercise, weight, age, family history, and fat distribution. It can be easy for people to not realize the symptoms of type two diabetes because they are usually gradual and get incorporated into that individuals daily lifestyle choices.

Overview:

Diabetes has significantly risen within the last two decades. With this article’s knowledge you can be prepared to know what type of factors cultivate the symptoms and causes of diabetes, how each type affects your body, and the differences between them. With this new information you may find it easier to point out the onset symptoms, and hopefully this article will empower a lifestyle change surrounded by generalized well-being, physical exercise, and a healthy diet.

 

We want to hear from you!

Throughout this article, what fascinated you the most? Let us know in the comments!

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics/2014statisticsreport.html

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes-in-children/symptoms-causes/dxc-20311397

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861

http://www.everydayhealth.com/diabetes/difference-between-type-1-type-2-diabetes.aspx

http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/diabetes/overview.html

Airport Codes Quiz Part 1

Posted by on Jun 6, 2017

Every airport in the world has a specific three-digit code, or the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Location Identifier Code. Originally, airports were identified by the same two-letter code that National Weather Service used to recognize the city it was in. As the amount of airports increased, a third letter was added to establish specific airports easier. In this quiz, see how many of these codes you can decipher:


 

Alabama- Montgomery Regional Airport

Alaska- Fairbanks International Airport

Arizona- Yuma International Airport

Arkansas- Clinton National Airport

California- Fresno Yosemite International Airport

Colorado- Grand Junction Regional Airport

Connecticut- Bradley International Airport

District of Columbia- Washington Dulles International Airport

Florida- Daytona Beach International Airport

Georgia- Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport

Hawaii- Kahului Airport

Idaho- Boise Airport

Illinois- Quad City International Airport

Indiana- South Bend International Airport

Iowa- The Eastern Iowa Airport

Kansas- Wichita Dwight D. Eisenhower National Airport

Kentucky- Blue Grass Airport

Louisiana- Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport

Maine- Bangor International Airport

Maryland- Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport

Massachusetts- Logan International Airport

Michigan- Kalamazoo-Battle Creek International Airport

Minnesota- Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport

Mississippi- Jackson–Medgar Wiley Evers International Airport

Missouri- Kansas City International Airport

AMT Day is May 24. Will there be a DMT Day?

Posted by on May 24, 2017

The FAA explores the future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, and the possible need for Drone Maintenance Technicians.

By Jul DeGeus

For obvious reasons, we at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance are highly anticipating the celebration of Aviation Maintenance Technician Day on May 24th.

On May 24th in 1868, Charles Edward Taylor was born on a farm in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. He would one day work on engines for the infamous Wright Brothers and become known as the first aviation maintenance technician. (1)

In the latest issue of the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Briefing, assistant editor Jennifer Caron transports you back to the early 1900’s, when the three “crazy” men attempted to make a solid object fly; something that is normal to us today. She then snaps us back into to the present with one genius question: “… you’re an AMT, watching in amazement as drones become increasingly popular. Are YOU the next Charlie Taylor — for drones?” (2)

She’s got a great point- what is the potential outlook for the UAS industry and UAS maintenance technicians? Caron explains the background, demand and the promising opportunities:

The job potential and growth is real, and most believe the UAS industry will grow exponentially. Just consider companies that look to use drones for package delivery. Theoretically, they will need thousands of UAS to meet delivery deadlines not only in the U.S., but around the world…The possibilities are vast. As more and more companies identify and create the need for UAS, the need for UAS technicians will flourish as well. (2)

AIM’s Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems training is a way for individuals to learn more about this evolving industry. It’s a two-day course offered at our Manassas, VA, Chesapeake VA, Atlanta – Metro GA, Dallas – Metro TX, Oakland CA, and Philadelphia PA campuses.

This article, “Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future?”, is a must read for those interested in UAS, as well as forward thinkers and innovators. Click here to read the article by Jennifer Caron, found on page 33.

Sources:

  1. Taylor, B. (n.d.). Charles E. Taylor: The Man Aviation History Almost Forgot. Retrieved from https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/phl/local_more/media/CT%20Hist.pdf
  2. Caron, J. (2017, May & June). Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future.FAA Safety Briefing, 33-34. doi:https://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2017/media/MayJun2017.pdf

Aviation Maintenance School Offering Summer Camp to Aspiring Mechanics

Posted by on May 23, 2017

Aviation Maintenance School Offering Summer Camp to Aspiring Mechanics

Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Jet Tech Summer Camp will provide participants a preview into the school’s FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician program.

By Brian Stauss

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) will be offering a glimpse into the world of aircraft maintenance through its annual Jet Tech Summer Aviation Maintenance Camp at select campuses.

Camp participants will spend time in AIM’s hangars, classrooms, and labs, learning about the basics of aviation maintenance. Topics covered will include aircraft systems and powerplants, ground operations, safety wiring, physics of flight, and much more. This is the perfect opportunity for individuals who are interested in working with their hands. The camp will also provide a preview of the skills aviation maintenance technicians perform after obtaining their certification.

Camp dates and locations are as follows:

 

Atlanta metro – June 23; 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Houston – June 26 – 30 or July 31 – Aug. 4; 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily

Indianapolis – June 19 – 23; 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Kansas City – June 16 or July 7; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Philadelphia – July 31; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

“Here at AIM, we strive to educate today’s youth about the important field of aviation maintenance,” says Ben Sitton, Campus Executive Director at AIM’s Atlanta metro campus. “Our Jet Tech Summer Camp is an excellent opportunity to do just that…to expose young boys and girls to a potential career path that otherwise may not have ever crossed their minds.”

AIM’s Jet Tech Summer Camp is open to upcoming high school graduates and rising high school seniors. Individuals interested in enrolling into the camp should contact the appropriate campus.

 

Atlanta metro – (678) 377-5600

Houston – (713) 644-7777

Indianapolis – (317) 243-4519

Kansas City – (816) 753-9920

Philadelphia – (215) 676-7700

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

Aviation Institute of Maintenance Campuses Selected to Partner with Delta Air Lines

Posted by on May 18, 2017

A number of Aviation Institute of Maintenance campuses have been selected for a partnership with Delta Air Lines. With this partnership, the campuses gain an industry resource in their efforts to train students in their quest to become FAA certified aviation maintenance technicians.

By Brian Stauss

A number of Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s (AIM) campuses have been selected by Delta Air Lines for a partnership in an effort to prepare for the hiring needs brought about by the forecasted demand for qualified aircraft maintenance technicians.

Over the last few months, Delta TechOps, the maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) division of Delta Airlines, has been evaluating aviation maintenance schools, searching for institutions that demonstrate a commitment to meeting Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards as well as Delta’s high principles that exceed these industry standards.

Selected for these partnerships include AIM campuses located in the metro areas of Atlanta, GA, Dallas, TX and Washington D.C, along with campuses in Las Vegas, NV and Chesapeake, VA.

“This partnership is an incredible opportunity for our students and graduates that will allow us continuous improvement of our Aviation Maintenance Technician program by partnering with one of the premier leaders in the aviation industry,” says Ben Sitton, Executive Director at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Atlanta metro campus. “Delta Air Lines recognizes the high demand of the Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT) position and we are honored to be a resource to assist them in attaining the industry’s best and brightest AMTs.”

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.