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FAA Career Training

Aviation Maintenance School to Showcase Drone Training Program for Local High Schoolers

Posted by on Oct 25, 2017

Course exposes students to key aspects of the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) industry with a focus on drone pilot training. This course is designed to help students obtain their operator certificate from the Federal Aviation Administration.

By Brian Stauss

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is now offering unmanned aerial systems (drone) training for individuals in the Charlotte, NC metro area. This comes as a response to the Part 107 regulations set forth by the FAA in regards to commercial use of unmanned aircraft and the growth of aerospace innovation within the Charlotte metro area.

AIM began offering this training to local students at Olympic High School on October 11th. Courses will continue through November 11th. The program teaches students the history of unmanned aircraft, their various uses, the development of governmental regulations relating to drone use, and explores future opportunities in this growing field of aviation.

“We offer the drone pilot course within the local communities of all 11 of our campuses around the country, and we make it a practice to offer free training opportunities to high school students within the communities we serve,” states Vice President of Operations for AIM, Dr. Joel English.  “We plan to bring our newest and most advanced AIM campus to the Charlotte area in 2018, and we feel that partnering with Olympic High School to provide its students with training and FAA certification is a meaningful entry into the Charlotte community.”

Specific topics covered in the drone course include airspace classifications, operating requirements, and various flight restrictions affecting small unmanned aircraft operation. Additional areas of learning include: the effects of weather on drone performance, aircraft loading, emergency procedures, radio communication procedures, drone maintenance and preflight inspection procedures, and more.

As a part of the program, AIM has signed a licensing agreement with Little Arms Ltd. for the use of their Zephyr drone flight simulator software.

The drone program culminates with a Fly Day event, to be held at Olympic High School from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This event is open to the public and will showcase the skills the students acquired during their training, highlighted by actual drone flight displays.

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s UAS training prepares students to take the FAA Unmanned Aircraft General (UAG) pilot exam, which is required to obtain their FAA 107 operator certificate.

“Learning how to operate unmanned aircraft systems and receiving the FAA 107 certificate places our students on the leading edge of the future of aviation,” says Michael Sasso, Director of Education at Aviation Institute of Maintenance. “This affords students the opportunity to fill the upcoming demand for drone pilots”.

For information about additional course dates, contact Michael Sasso at directoredamc@aviationmaintenance.edu or call (651) 494-4908.

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

Open House Preparation: How to Get the Most from Your Campus Visit

Posted by on Sep 18, 2017

Open houses, like campus tours, provide you with an opportunity to get information to decide whether or not to apply to a college. In a single visit, you can gather knowledge and impressions to aide you in your final college selection. But how can you make the most out of your visit? Simply by being prepared. Here are some tidbits to keep in mind the next time you attend a college open house:

Why Attend in the First Place?

Source: Getty Images.

Sometimes, the hardest part of picking a college is narrowing down your “top choices” list. Attending a college open house can make picking the right school a lot easier. Apart from this, other reasons to show up include getting a good feel for the campus atmosphere and learning more about the specific program you’re interested in. Here are reasons to attend.

What to Prepare For

It’s important to realize that college open house events are not an example of an everyday campus experience. However, this doesn’t mean that programs are not genuine, just that they are not typical. Expect the following:

  • Interviews Aren’t Guaranteed- At a campus where interviews are highly encouraged, you most likely will not have an opportunity to interview on the day of an open house. You will need to revisit campus later. However, the college may decide to offer regional interviews close to you.
  • Colleges Make a List and Check it Twice- Colleges monitor who visits their campus and who does not. This means that scheduling a campus visit or attending an open house may offer more benefits to students who takes extra initiative to scope out the campus.
  • Each Open House is Unique- Every open house you attend will possess similar features. You can expect to hear from the teaching staff, support staff, as well as current students. Most colleges have the day’s programs outlined online in advance. Identify the subject matter you find most important and follow up with the appropriate resources at the open house.
  • Welcome, Welcome, Welcome– Expect a warm welcome from everyone on campus. Staff members will be available and prepared to answer questions from you and your family, so be sure to bring them!
  • Network to Expand Your Web- There will be a lot of prospective students attending college open house, making it a great opportunity to interact. Connections made at the open house could become helpful to you in the future.

Questions to Ask

Source: Getty Images.

Talk to more than just the admission staff. Seek a number of students during your tour and ask them what they like and would change about their school. To get the best experience from your visit, prepare thoughtful questions to ask. Here are some examples:

  • What academic elements are considered in the admission process and how important are they?
  • Is it easy for students to do research with a professor?
  • What percentage of my financial need does the school meet?
  • What are my chances of landing internship opportunities and jobs?
  • What social opportunities are available to students?

More questions here.

Have fun at every open house you attend. Take some time beforehand to prepare and the day of, you’ll be able obtain all the information you need to help decide if that college deserves the top spot in your college line up!

AIM High for Success: Helpful Training Tips for Your Next Interview

Posted by on Jul 25, 2017

By: Esperanza Poquiz; Edited by Jul DeGeus

The interview process is often found to be nerve-wracking, but preparing yourself can help relieve some of the stress. These training tips can help brace you for your next interview session:

Before the Interview

Gathering materials is essential when going into your interview. Have everything that you need organized and assembled the night before. Bring pens, a notebook, two or more copies of your resume, and your portfolio, if applicable. Research the company and its mission statement prior to the meeting. You should have at least three questions relevant to the company or the position you applied for ready to ask your interviewer.

Dress For the Job You Want

Wearing appropriate clothing promotes a lasting first impression. Stay away from busy patterns and wear neutral colors like: gray, black, white and navy blue. Upon the initial meeting, be sure to have great posture, a firm handshake and a smile on your face.

Confidence is Key

During the engagement, remain confident. Stay away from touching your face and playing with your hair. Keep hand gestures to a minimum and speak with proper grammar. Projecting enthusiasm allows the hiring manager see your interest in obtaining the position, as well as your positivity.  Show them that you are able to take initiative and know what you want.

Final Touches

Refrain from stating negative comments about previous employment. Be brief on why you no longer have a position. Don’t focus too much on pay or schedules; these are more appropriate to talk about in a second interview or after you have received a job offer. Turn off or silence your phone and do not use it during the interview.

Once you feel that you are ready, test these tips and conduct a mock interview with your friends or family. Good luck with your next interview!

Reasons to Attend an Open House

Posted by on Jul 11, 2017

Where you should attend college is one of the biggest decisions you may make. There are plenty of colleges to choose from, based on the program you plan to pursue. But how do you choose? Simple: attend open houses.

An open house is an important opportunity to learn about a particular program you are interested in through interaction with students and staff members. It’s a day you get to experience the environment of the campus and meet possible future classmates.

Experience the Campus Atmosphere

You’ve probably done tons of research about the institution you are visiting: the location of the campus, what classes are offered, how long school will take, etc. However, visiting the college is what will give you a personal feel about it; you can absolutely love or hate the campus based your open house experience. Use the visit to decide if the school environment is a good fit for you.

Learn More About Programs

Researching the program you want to study will give you great insight into your future career, but nothing beats a conversation with the instructors who will be teaching you the courses you plan to take. They can clarify any questions you have about the program you are interested in. Teachers can outline the course to help you decide if the program of your choosing is right for you.

Explore New Technology

At an open house, you are exposed to all the advanced tools and equipment the college offers. While you might not get to experience every tool in the shop, open houses often present unique opportunities to interact with some of the tools you’ll be using for class.

Make New Friends

If you are serious about attending the college, going to the open house can mark as an important day in your college life. You might meet fellow future students who could become your friends for the rest of your college career. Interaction with continuing students allows you the opportunity to network and score some experienced study buddies.

A college open house is a resource you should look forward to tap into. While you should come with questions, don’t forget to have fun

Quick History: The Background of the Fourth of July

Posted by on Jul 4, 2017

The United States celebrates Independence Day every July 4th as the nation’s birthday. The holiday more accurately represents the date in 1776 when the 13 “United Colonies” declared freedom from the British Empire by adopting the Declaration of Independence. The colonists went on to defeat Great Britain in the Revolutionary War, which led to the formation of a new independent nation. Here are some important facts on 4th of July history.

Source: Library of Congress.

Early American Timeline

  • May 15, 1776 – Virginia Convention approves a resolution to declare independence
  • June 7, 1776 – The Resolution of Independence, also known as the Lee Resolution, is proposed by Richard Henry Lee of Virginia
  • June 11, 1776 – Colonists meet in Philadelphia for the Second Continental Congress to draft the Declaration of Independence
  • July 2, 1776 – The Continental Congress votes for independence
  • July 4, 1776 – The Continental Congress adopts the final version of the Declaration after changes are made to Thomas Jefferson’s original draft
  • July 8, 1776 – Ringing of bells at Independence Square in Philadelphia marks the first public readings of the Declaration
  • August 2, 1776 – Final signatures of the Declaration are completed
  • November 15, 1777 – Congress ratifies the Articles of Confederation
  • March 1, 1781 – Final ratification of Articles of Confederation by all states

Toward a New Nation

The writers of the Declaration were known as the “Committee of Five,” which, besides Jefferson, included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Roger Sherman and Robert Livingston. The Declaration of Independence included a list of grievances that the colonies had toward Britain. One of the main complaints was taxation without representation.

The American Revolutionary War began in 1775 and France began aiding Americans in 1777. Other American allies included Spain and the Dutch Republic. The war lasted on American soil through 1781. The naval battle ended on September 3, 1783, when King George III of Britain signed the Treaty of Paris.

The United States finalized the Constitution on September 8, 1787. In 1789, George Washington was elected the nation’s first president. By 1790, all 13 states had ratified the Constitution. Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, both died on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence in 1826. Another Founding Father, James Monroe, died on July 4, 1831.

Holiday History

Philadelphia celebrated Independence Day on July 4, 1777. After that, the celebrations spread from town to town every July 4th, but it wasn’t until after 1812 that it became widespread. It wasn’t until 1870 when Congress established July 4th as an official national holiday, called “Independence Day.” Congress then reaffirmed it as a paid holiday for federal workers in 1938.

Celebrations often include fireworks and outdoor music events. “The Star-Spangled Banner” became the national anthem in 1931, although the lyrics were written in 1814 by Francis Scott Key and the melody was based on an earlier British song called “Anacreon in Heaven” by John Stafford Smith. Another popular song associated with 4th of July history is “The Stars and Stripes Forever,” written in 1896 by John Philip Sousa.

Diabetes: What You Need to Know

Posted by on Jun 21, 2017

By Max Murphy

Diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death in 2010. With over 29 million Americans diagnosed according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention diabetes is becoming an increasingly urgent condition within the healthcare industry. The truth of the matter is, most people aren’t aware of how diabetes is formed in their bodies, so they don’t recognize the early onset symptoms.

So, what exactly causes diabetes?

Diabetes is caused by various factors, which include; genetics, exposure to various viruses, over-eating, malnutrition, blood glucose levels, your body’s autoimmune system, and generalized pancreas abuse. There are two forms of diabetes, type one; and type two. To understand how you can combat diabetes, you must first understand how each type of disease is affecting your body.

Type One:

Type one Diabetes is a chronic auto-immune disease in which your pancreas produces little to no insulin, which is a hormone that allows glucose (a sugar) to enter cells to produce energy for power. Type one is usually found within adolescents and makes its primary appearance in children. It has the potential to form later in life, but your body naturally becomes more resistant over time. Despite ongoing medical research, type one diabetes does not have a cure. Healthcare professionals can only prevent and manage the onset symptoms of this type of diabetes, so it doesn’t become a life threatening concern.

What causes it?

Medical scientists have been researching type one diabetes for over 2 decades, and have made a ton of progress in the evaluation, management, and prevention of such disease, but as of right now, the industry still does not exactly know how type one diabetes is formed in the body. The end result in type one is your body’s inability to maintain and regulate insulin producing cells within your pancreas due to certain responses within our body’s immune system. With this disease, your body’s immune system actually attacks the cells that create insulin within you.

Type Two:

Doctors can prevent and maintain type two diabetes in a number of ways. This type is most prevalent in adults, and you become more susceptible to symptoms as your body ages. However, within the last decade it has become an increasing problem in children, primarily due to obesity and lack of exercise.  Type two diabetes has most of the symptoms of type one, but instead of not being able to maintain insulin, in type two, your body actually becomes resistant to it.

How does insulin become resistant?

Scientific researchers propose that the resistance of insulin is caused by numerous factors, but the lead diagnosis is that it is centralized in a mal-nutritious diet, over consumption of mono-saturated fats, and incessant inactivity.

Do they have anything in common?

Type one and type two diabetes are not the same disease. Most people assume that to be true because they both are under the same umbrella. But the effects and causes of both of them are completely different.

Type one is primarily caused by a genetically derived autoimmune issues in which your body allows too much blood sugar into your system without having the necessary amount of insulin to break that sugar down into a manageable soluble carbohydrates that can be shifted into glucose and furthermore, into energy for your cells.

Type two on the other hand, is pioneered from multiple factors that primarily circulate around a lack of general exercise, weight, age, family history, and fat distribution. It can be easy for people to not realize the symptoms of type two diabetes because they are usually gradual and get incorporated into that individuals daily lifestyle choices.

Overview:

Diabetes has significantly risen within the last two decades. With this article’s knowledge you can be prepared to know what type of factors cultivate the symptoms and causes of diabetes, how each type affects your body, and the differences between them. With this new information you may find it easier to point out the onset symptoms, and hopefully this article will empower a lifestyle change surrounded by generalized well-being, physical exercise, and a healthy diet.

 

We want to hear from you!

Throughout this article, what fascinated you the most? Let us know in the comments!

 

Sources:

https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/data/statistics/2014statisticsreport.html

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-1-diabetes-in-children/symptoms-causes/dxc-20311397

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/dxc-20169861

http://www.everydayhealth.com/diabetes/difference-between-type-1-type-2-diabetes.aspx

http://www.nytimes.com/health/guides/disease/diabetes/overview.html