AIM Blog

FAA Career Training

Sopwith Camel Project is moving ahead

Posted by on Jun 24, 2012

After a too long period of little to no work done on this project, we are now back in gear and moving ahead.  Just to bring the readers up to date, the team estimates that that the steel tube fuselage is 90% complete, the tail feathers are ready for cover, and the landing gear is about halfway done.  The engine sits off in the corner, ready for installation.

Nearly complete, the fuselage sits waiting for the wings to be done.

Completed parts awaiting installation

The current effort has moved to the wings and ailerons.  This means a lot of wood work, and some steel fabrication (aileron hinges).  Lots of gluing, routing, cutting, sanding and fitting.  A new group of dedicated students have emerged and we have seen them logging more and more hours on this projects.  We have a new “blogmeister” in Camron Staples, our Student Advisor.  That should mean much more regular updates to let the world know what is going on in Manassas.

 

Avro 504K

Posted by on Mar 29, 2007

It looks like our budget is getting ironed out, so we are putting things on the fast track. Making space in the shop setting up our work area and equipment. I am looking foward to getting started and working with the FAA. Arch and I have been going over the prints, working out some of the detailes and figering out the best way to start.

Engine Info

Posted by on Feb 23, 2007

FYI Rotec offers a new radial engine for sale at a fair price R2800 (110hp) or R3600 (150hp) they will even help with some engeering for the mounting. If you plan on using a radial engine you should go to there web site and ck it out.

A British Aircraft To Round Out the Fleet

Posted by on Feb 21, 2007

Team Manassas has opted to round out the AIM collection of Word War I aircraft by adding a British entry.  They will be building an Avro 504K.

The Avro 504 was built by the Avro company, and under licence by others.  The first 504 was built in 1913.  Production totalled 8,340 and continued for almost twenty years. It was used by both the Royal Flying Corps and the Roal Naval Air Service as a trainer, bomber and reconnaissance plane.

The 504 was the first airplane to strafe troops on the ground as well as the first to make a bombing raid over Germany.  It was also the first Allied airplane to be downed by enemy anti-aircraft fire.  The plane was withdrawn from frontline service in the summer of 1915 but remained the standard British trainer for the rest of the war.

The 504 is easily recognizable because of the single skid between the wheels.

 

avro-504k-1