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Drone Industry Outlook

Posted by on Sep 26, 2017

The Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) states, “the drones are coming.” And with them, they are going to bring jobs as well as an economic impact due to the changes in the drone industry, especially with the introduction of part 107 by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Drone Industry Growth

Business Insider defines drones as “aerial vehicles that can fly autonomously or be piloted by a remote individual.” Using this definition, they expect:

  • Sales to go past $12 billion in 2021,a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 7.6% from 2016’s $8.5 billion
  • Consumer drones alone to hit 29 million in 2021, a CAGR of 31.3%
  • 805,000 in 2021 enterprise drones, a CAGR of 51% from 2016’s 102,600

The military drone market is mature with the Department of Defense (DOD) looking to increase its more than 7,000 drones in 2012 by 50 more at an estimated cost of $2.9 billion.

Estimated Economic Impact

The FAA 2015 prediction deadline for integrating drones into the national civilian airspace forecasted:

  • $82.1 billion in economic impact by 2025
  • 100,000 jobs by 2025

Who Will Buy Drones?

In a report by Markets and Markets, North America leads the forecast by 45% as the dominant regional market. Domestically in the US, agricultural drone applications will dwarf all others accounting for $75.6 billion of the total economic impact by 2025, according to AUVSI. Government facilities follow up by $3.2 billion while all other sectors combed will take up $3.2 billion of the economic impact.

Based on application: Aerial photography and remote sensing is expected to lead.

Based on duration of service: Short duration service is expected to lead.

Drone Economy Among States

AUVSI observes that the drone economy will not be spread in an even manner. The domestic drone boom will hugely benefit:

  • California*
  • Washington
  • Texas*
  • Florida*
  • Arizona

Other states that will still benefit albeit in a small manner are:

  • Oklahoma
  • Indiana*
  • Ohio

*These states are home to AIM: San Francisco Bay, California – Metro, Houston, Texas, Dallas, Texas – Metro, Orlando, Florida – Metro and Indianapolis, Indiana.

Small Model Hobbyists Drone Growth Prediction

The FAA predicts the hobbyists’ fleet to more than triple in size from 1.1 million vehicles in 2016 to more than 3.5 million in 2021. This represents a CAGR of 26.4%.

The drone industry is expected to grow. Take Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Unmanned Aircraft Systems course to become a part of this industry. This course is offered at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance – Manassas VAChesapeake VAAtlanta – Metro GAOakland Metro CA, Dallas –Metro TX, Houston TX, Kansas City MO, Philadelphia PA, and Las Vegas NV campuses.

Job Opportunities for Drone Operators

Posted by on Aug 8, 2017

By Esperanza Poquiz & Jul DeGeus

When Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), or drones, were first introduced, they were commonly known as expensive toys that were used to race and fly for enjoyment. Agile and small enough to fit into tight spaces, operators quickly realized they could explore alternate ways to use drones to their advantage. And so, drones were quickly integrated into the workforce, providing assistance and efficiency to select industries. Here are a few:

  • Photography –Using drones, photographers are able to get aerial photographs. This is an advantage as it allows the photographer to capture an image without disrupting the moment. These sky-high snapshots are a great way for beginners to set their portfolio apart from the rest. Whether it’s shooting for weddings, corporate events or just artistic curiosity, drone photography has become a popular request. Even real estate agencies look to drone operator photographers to shoot from above ground and to get a 360° view their properties.

  • Company Inspections and Surveillance – A variety of different types of properties require maintenance and inspections on a on a daily basis. There are facilities that prove to be too dangerous to inspect manually, so instead of having an inspector assess the property, companies enlist the aid of drones to access the area. Additionally, drones enable companies, like wind farms or constructions sites, to survey the land for design.
  • Films- Always wanted to be a part of filming a big blockbuster hit? Cinematography, like parts featured in movies such as Skyfall, Jurassic World and Captain America: Civil War, sometimes require shots to be filmed by drones. If Hollywood is not your scene but you still have a passions for filming, videographers use drones to capture events like weddings, documentaries and commercials.
  • First Responders – Drones are supporting our community heroes by feeding rescuers live video streams that allow them to assess situations to come up with the safest plan before going into a hostile environment. First responders use drone operators to help locate people who are missing in an area that is too large to cover by foot, while fire fighters and police assign drones with the task of detecting people in danger and finding the safest path in life-threatening situations.
  • Deliveries-Large companies, like Walmart, Amazon and Google, are testing out idea of using drone operators for delivery services. This feature could hasten the delivery process of online orders. Instead of waiting days for a package to arrive, the consumer could receive the package in hours.

  • Drone Racing- What once started as a casual pastime, drone racing has become a popular tech sport. Drone operating teams enter competitions for cash prizes and companies have given the winners of these matches sponsorships and contracts to continue racing for money.

If this has sparked your interest check out our Unmanned Aircraft Systems course to help you get started towards your career!

Drones: Why You Need Your Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Even if You aren’t Pursuing an Aviation Degree

Posted by on Jul 11, 2017

Drones: Why You Need Your Unmanned Aircraft Systems Training, Even if You aren’t Pursuing an Aviation Degree

The FAA’s specific rules for flying a drone for recreational purposes are simple to follow. You only need to register your UAV and know a few other restrictions to be on the right side of the law. However, more UAV owners today are seeking training even when they have no intention to pursue an aviation degree in the future. Here are reasons why:

UAV Rules Coming into Effect

The FAA small unmanned aircraft system rule came into effect on August 2016. According to MacLean Insurance Company, more proposed rules are expected to become effective in a few months’ time.

However, the UAS training being offered by AIM won’t get outdated anytime soon. Your training at AIM will prepare you to be certified by the FAA and will comply with regulations. You’ll have the benefit of knowing you are certified to fly your drone under all the regulations likely to be enforced in the near future.

Insurers Demand

Planning to get an insurance cover for your drone? Don’t be surprised if your insurer asks for your training certificate. At the moment, many insurer companies are lenient about the level of training you have before accepting to cover your drone. However, in the future it’s more likely that you won’t find drone insurance without the necessary level of training.

Lack of Training Content

Only few drone manufacturers sell manuals and instructions that can help you learn how to fly the UAV safely. The rest lack detailed instructions and might not cover all operational questions you may have. You don’t have to rely on these manuals to fly your UAV, fortunately. You can learn how to assemble parts and take care of your drone in case of any problems from a good training course.

Business Opportunities are rising

According to Droneguru.net, it’s possible to build a career with your UAV. In the advertising industry, for example, there are opportunities for someone willing to invest their time with a drone. From simply flying banners with promotional messages in high traffic areas to taking photographs for developing adverts, there’s a future in drone advertising. Other popular industries where you can take your UAV aerial footage work are filmmaking, construction and farming.

Pursue an UAV course and gain skills that will help you fly and take care of your drone with little hassle.

Open House, Open Questions: What to Ask When Attending an Open House

Posted by on Jun 13, 2017

Campus open houses are the time to experience how it feels to attend a certain college. It’s also the time to ask important questions since campus staff is available to assist you. While the amount of questions you could ask is endless, we’ve compiled questions you don’t want to forget to get the answers to when visiting an open house:

Admissions Questions

  • What is your process of admission?

This question helps you assess your chances of getting admitted into the college based on your qualification details.

  • What are your educational requirements?
  • What do I need to succeed while at this campus?

Get an idea of the personal principles and values you need to do well at the college. This question also helps you evaluate the general attitude of the campus towards education and non-academic issues.

Financial Questions

  • What is the total cost of my tuition?

This could be a broad question, so break it down into sections you consider most important to you. Ask about the tuition fees and the types of payment plans offered. And don’t stop there. Go on to read any financial guide the campus gives you to ensure that you are ready to handle all the financial obligations.

  • Are tools and books included in tuition?
  • Does the program you’re interested in require a uniform? If so, is it included in tuition?
  • Are there any scholarship programs available?
  • Do you have financial aid programs for your students?

Most schools do and it’s important that you find out so you have the opportunity to access a form of extra financial support.

Questions about the Campus Environment

  • What is the overall campus environment like?

Learn the “vibe” of the campus and it surrounding facilities to make sure that it is an environment that you can adapt to and will be comfortable in for a long period of time.

  • What kind of social activities does your campus participate in?

Find out what types of events are held at the campus, if any. This could be a way for you to meet new friends and also network to find a connection for your career down the line.

Adult Learners- Support Questions

With more responsibility comes more questions. You may be presented with a different set of obstacles that require you to seek out additional support to make your education possible.

  • Do you aid in job placement assistance?
  • What counseling and guidance services do you offer to students? Are these services accessible?
  • Is tutoring available?
  • Is there a Student Center?
  • Do you offer child care or have services nearby?
  • Transportation is key. Do you have a ride share program or provide transportation services for students who don’t have a vehicle?
  • What can career services help me with?

Be sure you ask the questions that are most important to you when attending an open house. Make the most out of this opportunity to get the information you need to help decide if the institution is right for you!

AMT Day is May 24. Will there be a DMT Day?

Posted by on May 24, 2017

The FAA explores the future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, and the possible need for Drone Maintenance Technicians.

By Jul DeGeus

For obvious reasons, we at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance are highly anticipating the celebration of Aviation Maintenance Technician Day on May 24th.

On May 24th in 1868, Charles Edward Taylor was born on a farm in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. He would one day work on engines for the infamous Wright Brothers and become known as the first aviation maintenance technician. (1)

In the latest issue of the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Briefing, assistant editor Jennifer Caron transports you back to the early 1900’s, when the three “crazy” men attempted to make a solid object fly; something that is normal to us today. She then snaps us back into to the present with one genius question: “… you’re an AMT, watching in amazement as drones become increasingly popular. Are YOU the next Charlie Taylor — for drones?” (2)

She’s got a great point- what is the potential outlook for the UAS industry and UAS maintenance technicians? Caron explains the background, demand and the promising opportunities:

The job potential and growth is real, and most believe the UAS industry will grow exponentially. Just consider companies that look to use drones for package delivery. Theoretically, they will need thousands of UAS to meet delivery deadlines not only in the U.S., but around the world…The possibilities are vast. As more and more companies identify and create the need for UAS, the need for UAS technicians will flourish as well. (2)

AIM’s Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems training is a way for individuals to learn more about this evolving industry. It’s a two-day course offered at our Manassas, VA, Chesapeake VA, Atlanta – Metro GA, Dallas – Metro TX, Oakland CA, and Philadelphia PA campuses.

This article, “Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future?”, is a must read for those interested in UAS, as well as forward thinkers and innovators. Click here to read the article by Jennifer Caron, found on page 33.

Sources:

  1. Taylor, B. (n.d.). Charles E. Taylor: The Man Aviation History Almost Forgot. Retrieved from https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/phl/local_more/media/CT%20Hist.pdf
  2. Caron, J. (2017, May & June). Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future.FAA Safety Briefing, 33-34. doi:https://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2017/media/MayJun2017.pdf

Aviation Institute of Maintenance Campuses Selected to Partner with Delta Air Lines

Posted by on May 18, 2017

A number of Aviation Institute of Maintenance campuses have been selected for a partnership with Delta Air Lines. With this partnership, the campuses gain an industry resource in their efforts to train students in their quest to become FAA certified aviation maintenance technicians.

By Brian Stauss

A number of Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s (AIM) campuses have been selected by Delta Air Lines for a partnership in an effort to prepare for the hiring needs brought about by the forecasted demand for qualified aircraft maintenance technicians.

Over the last few months, Delta TechOps, the maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) division of Delta Airlines, has been evaluating aviation maintenance schools, searching for institutions that demonstrate a commitment to meeting Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards as well as Delta’s high principles that exceed these industry standards.

Selected for these partnerships include AIM campuses located in the metro areas of Atlanta, GA, Dallas, TX and Washington D.C, along with campuses in Las Vegas, NV and Chesapeake, VA.

“This partnership is an incredible opportunity for our students and graduates that will allow us continuous improvement of our Aviation Maintenance Technician program by partnering with one of the premier leaders in the aviation industry,” says Ben Sitton, Executive Director at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Atlanta metro campus. “Delta Air Lines recognizes the high demand of the Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT) position and we are honored to be a resource to assist them in attaining the industry’s best and brightest AMTs.”

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.