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The Page Master: AIM’s Spotlight on Librarians

Posted by on Apr 4, 2017

By Jul DeGeus

Imagine this: Your final paper on ”The History of Cleaning and Corrosion Control” is due tomorrow but you forgot to cite the book you used, and even worse, you forgot the name of the book. You make an emergency trip to the library, but when you walk in, no one is there. A building abandoned, books are scattered everywhere, piled atop of one another with no rhyme or reason in how they are categorized. Will you find the book in enough time to turn in your paper?

Thanks to the hard work and organization skills of librarians, this is an unlikely situation to find yourself in. April 4th is National School Librarian Day and here at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance, we wanted to take the time to recognize some of our all-star librarians:

 

AIM Atlanta

 

Rebecca (left) assists a student with homework.

Rebecca Crosby

“Rebecca Crosby has been working for AIM Atlanta for nearly 14 years. She is a superstar on campus and we are proud to have her as our librarian. Rebecca became interested in Library Science as a high school student. She took five years of Library Science courses while attending Berkmar High School in Lilburn, GA.

Rebecca began her career at AIM as a receptionist. The campus was based out of a hangar called “Briscoe Field” and had no library. When AIM Atlanta moved into its new campus building nine years ago, Rebecca made the leap to Campus Librarian. Rebecca loves working in the library because she is able to help students and connect with them on a daily basis. Like almost every other librarian, she also loves to read! Rebecca’s favorite book, for now, is “The Notebook” by Nicholas Sparks. “

-AIM Atlanta Staff

AIM Chesapeake

 

Leah Veal

“Shout out to the amazing Mrs. Leah Veal, our Librarian and PSI proctor. No matter the task or project, she is always willing to assist wherever she is needed. Even if that means hunting down a missing manual; she will look for it and she will find it. Both students and staff appreciate you and your enthusiasm when helping others. Thank you, Leah, for everything that you do!”

-AIM Chesapeake Staff

AIM Dallas

 

Valerie Harris

“Valerie Harris has worked at AIM Dallas as the campus librarian since 2015. Prior to that, she worked in education for over 25 years. She graduated from The University of Southern Mississippi with a Bachelor’s Degree in Library and Information Science and minored in History. Valerie has improved our library processes and coordination. She is always willing to provide a helping hand to students searching for specific information or material. Thank you for always making sure the library remains a quiet haven for our students to study. “

-AIM Dallas Staff

AIM Houston

 

Lucero Rosales

“Lucero ‘Lucy the Librarian’ Rosales began her career at AIM Houston as a part time receptionist and was promoted to Assistant Librarian shorty after. Lucy is very creative and always willing to help any student or staff member. She currently attends Houston Community College where she is studying pastry arts and plans to open a bistro after college. We’re so proud of all of your hard work, Lucy!”

-AIM Houston Staff

AIM Kansas City

 

Frederick Douglas Thomas

Aptly named after the famous Frederick Douglass, AIM Kansas City’s Frederick Douglas Thomas is treasure to our school.  A man of many titles, Fredrick is the Librarian, Career Services Coordinator, director of FAA test proctoring, and head of the graduation committee. He is a constant rock of support for his students and colleagues, encouraging excellence, honor, integrity and humility. He challenges everyone he interacts with to become their best selves and does it all while looking like a million bucks! Thank you for all that you do!”

-AIM Kansas City Staff

AIM Oakland

 

Karoline Correa

“Karoline received her BA in History from the University of Central Florida and her Masters in Library Science from San Jose State. Karoline became a librarian because, ‘I have a deep love for history and books; this is a career that allows me to fulfill that passion and share it with others.’ We’re lucky that our library is the one you get to share your passion with!”

-AIM Oakland Staff

AIM Orlando

 

Noreen Bhual

“Noreen started at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance in Orlando on January 26, 2015 and plays a dual role.  She is the testing proctor in the afternoons and the Evening Library Assistant, accommodating students with their Learning Resource Center needs.  Noreen comes from New York, likes to keep busy and ‘loves to help people.’”

Ruth Brathwaite

“Ruth is the Daytime Library Assistant at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance in Orlando. She started at the campus on May 12, 2016 and ‘loves working with our students.’   Originally from St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Ruth enjoys cooking and singing gospel music in her spare time. “

-AIM Orlando Staff

Student-Built WWI Aircraft Arrives at Fighter Factory

Posted by on Oct 19, 2015

Late in September, a number of crates were delivered to the Military Aviation Museum’s Fighter Factory from the Aviation Institute of Maintenance – Kansas City campus, where a team of students and instructors have been working on the Museum’s latest aircraft, a World War I vintage Morane-Saulnier AI, building it from the ground up.

Morane-Saulnier AI arrives at FF Morane-Saulnier AI wings delivered


Click here to read more…Student-Built WWI Aircraft Arrives at Fighter Factory

Aviation career school students recreate WWI Morane-Saulnier

Posted by on Jul 15, 2013

Originally broadcast by KCTV – Faces of Kansas City on August 30, 2012

The student volunteers at Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) in Kansas City were featured on the Faces of Kansas City segment of KCTV channel 5 news.  The students at this aviation career school were billed as working on the “Ultimate Student Project”.  Of course the Morane-Saultier that they have been building was showcased.  There were also some interviews with both students and staff of AIM – Kansas City.  James Shumaker, Chris Hendrix, Patrick Nelson, Marvin Story and James Benton all provided their input on the building of the WWI aircraft.

During the segment, the process used to cover the wings for the WWI aircraft was discussed and shown.  Chris was quoted as saying, “Just like in World War I everything in this aircraft is completely hand-built. We have designed and hand built every aspect of it. We’ve really been working off of photos rather than blueprints.”

Although it was mentioned that the WWI Morane-Saulnier was to be finished in a couple of months and then flown to the Fighter Factory in Virginia Beach, the aircraft is still currently hangared at AIM Kansas City.

Find out more about

the best aviation career school

Lots of detail work on Morane war aircraft project

Posted by on Sep 24, 2012

The Morane war aircraft project at Aviation Institute of Maintenance in Kansas City has gotten down to where the remaining work is related to the finer points of construction. The engine installation needs to be finished and that meant a little rework on the firewall.  We will require a larger fuel tank to give the range on the Morane that we wanted.  This means lots of replumbing of the fuel and oil lines. And we will still need to construct the exhaust system.

Some of you may remember, way back when, we tried to adapt the Russian built exhaust system that came with the engine.  We found problem after problem with the design and  welding the alloys used on the original. We solved the problem by finding a company that could roll the exhaust collector to our specifications for the Morane and we would take it from there. The first sections are now being fitted up, and things are going much smoother now.

New Exhaust on Morane at AIM Kansas City

The first sections of the new exhaust collector are being fitted and installed.

Our student aviation maintenance technicians had constructed and then modified the original fuel tank to fit the space.  But after they had fitted it up, they discovered that the capacity was not adequate to provide enough flying time in the Morane to accomplish even the flights needed to move the airplane between airshows.  A new, larger capacity tank was designed and built.  When the welding was done, all of the tanks we had built needed to be leak tested before we begin installing them.

Leak Test on Morane Fuel Tank at AIM Kansas City

Team leader Marvin Story leak tests one of the tanks built for the project.

 

With enough struts to hold up a bridge, the Morane needed a little help in streamlining all of that tubing.  The modern streamlined tubing we see used for struts today was not available, so round tube was used for the struts, and wood was shaped for streamling.  The aviation career school students have completed building all of the wood pieces and are now installing them.  They will be secured with linen thread wrapped around the wood, and then the whole assembly varnished to protect it from the elements.

Streamlining the struts on the Morane at AIM Kansas City

The wooden streamling has been installed on this strut. In the background you can see the steel tube of the rear strut which has not been covered yet.

Wrappings on the Morane at AIM Kansas City

Here is a closeup of the linen cord wrapped around the wood pieces to secure them in place. The whole assembly will receive a final coat of varnish to finish it.

While the detail work on the Morane is progressing slowly, it is necessary and a very important part of having a safe and historically accurate final product.

Stay tuned for the next installment on

the Morane war aircraft project from AIM Kansas City

Team Kansas City Makes the News

Posted by on Sep 5, 2012

The Morane project at Kansas City caught the interest of one of the local TV stations.  They sent a crew out to the school and spent some time interviewing both students and staff regarding the project. 

Patrick Nelson is interviewed for the "Faces of Kansas City" presentation featuring the Morane.

 To see the segment as it aired, this link will take you there:

http://www.kctv5.com/story/19419932/faces-of-kansas-city-bringing-historical-aviation-to-life

 

Final work load?

Posted by on Jul 18, 2012

OK here at Kansas we have implemented our final phase of “completion” with a countdown to engine start…more on that later…

Currently we have received the exhaust tubing, engine has been removed for installing the exhaust, which needs fabrication of the headers and ring…

We’ve also placed the last tank expansion for the fuel cell… ready for finish weld.