Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Blog

AIM Manassas Gets Visit from Vietnamese Embassy

Posted by on May 18, 2016

Vietnamese Deligation at AIM Manassas

It’s a long way to AIM Manassas from Vietnam, but well worth the travel; so said the delegation from the Vietnamese Embassy as they explored the campus of AIM Manassas back in February. Their purpose was simple; to find an appropriate facility to train their countrymen/women in fixing aircraft safely and effectively. John Allbright (Director of Education) and Jan Schoonmaker (Campus Executive Director) were the perfect hosts as they accompanied the guests around the campus pointing out the extensive handson equipment used in teaching students. Let us not forget the faculty, most of whom have over 20 years of field experience while also holding an A&P License. Near the lobby, next to the glowing AIM sign, the tour ended. The officials of Vietnam seemed pleased with the expertise and professionalism of the staff, faculty and curriculum taught. As the months go by our campus seems to become a magnet of diversity, brimming with chances to learn new cultures. This makes AIM Manassas a great place to study a vocation built on safely maintaining the globalization of travel as we know it today.

AIM has been approved by the United States Department of Immigration for the acceptance of international students. All international students must be fluent in English before they enroll. Applicants will be asked to furnish proof that they can read, write, and speak English fluently. International student applicants must meet the following requirement for admission to AIM. Students abroad who wish to study at our aviation maintenance school in the USA are encouraged to contact us through the student request form on this page. Additional information and instructions will be provided for you upon request. We have knowledgeable admissions representatives who may be able to answer questions about study, international student visa and travel in the USA.

Click here to learn more about international student opportunities!

 

Aviation Institute of Maintenance Launches Free Online “Human Factors” Safety Course

Posted by on May 13, 2016

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) launched a free online course in Human Factors for aviation professionals, students, and enthusiasts around the globe. Understanding that 80% of all aviation-related incidents and injury occur because of human error, oversight, fatigue, and other human-related factors, AIM intends to combat such incidents by offering widespread instruction and guidance on minimizing risk. The school encourages students, professionals, and volunteers to enroll in this free continuing education course by visiting www.Aviation.edu.

Register for the free Human Factors Course Now!

In addition to the free Human Factors course, AIM has also made available an advanced online professional certification course entitled, “Minimizing the Risk of Incident and Injury due to Human Factors.” This certification course provides an in-depth understanding of the twelve most common human-related risk factors for aviation incidents, known as the “dirty dozen.” This course draws from the material in the introductory curriculum and allows the trainee to apply their knowledge and experience to numerous scenario-based situations in order to become more aware of accidents, why they happen, and how to avoid them. The instructor-led certification process carries a cost of $49 and awards graduates a certification from Aviation Institute of Maintenance.

Dr. Joel English, Vice President of Operations at AIM and author of Plugged In: Succeeding as an Online Learner, states that both the free introductory course and the full certification course are examples of innovative technologies and strong online teaching methods. “Our certification course doesn’t have the anonymous feel of a ‘MOOC,’ where the trainee wades through streams of information with no interaction. It’s situation based, there’s interaction with the instructor, and the assessments draw directly from the scenarios that the video lectures discuss.” The courses feature high definition video instruction, interaction with others in the course, and examples from authentic experiences that help the aviation professional think critically about safety in the workplace. English states, “AIM has always dedicated our instruction to awareness of the possibility for accidents or injury, and we found no reason to keep this innovative coursework to ourselves, when professionals around the industry could benefit.”

Aviation Institute of Maintenance is the United States’ largest family of aviation maintenance schools, with headquarters in Virginia Beach, Va. Students learn the skills necessary to become successful in one of the world’s fastest growing industries, aviation maintenance and the free Human Factors course and certification are examples of the school’s passion and commitment to the aviation industry. To see why Human Factors are important in the avionics industry, review the Role of Human Factors in the FAA.

Learn more at: www.Aviation.edu.

KA114 ‘Mosquito’ Wins Grand Champion at EAA Oshkosh Airshow

Posted by on Jul 30, 2015

EAA logoThe EAA AirVenture 2015 airshow, held July 20-26 in Oshkosh, WI, was the place to be for aviation enthusiasts of all ages. The week-long gathering set many firsts for the annual event, bringing together approximately 550,000 people, wanting to experience the history and thrills that only aircraft can bring.

This year’s tag line, “Only in Oshkosh,” was true to form, with a diverse array of aircraft on display, ranging from personal aircraft to the debut of the F-35 Lightning II, the only airworthy B-29 “Fifi” and the first-ever landing of a B-52 at the show.

Click here to read more…KA114 ‘Mosquito’ Wins Grand Champion at EAA Oshkosh Airshow

A Glimpse into Aviation’s Possible Future?

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014

What will the aviation industry look like in 2030?  2040? You can bet it won’t be what we’re used to today.  Sir Richard Branson, president of Virgin Atlantic Airways, put it this way: “I have no doubt that during my lifetime we will be able to fly from London to Sydney in under two hours, with minimal environmental impact. The awe-inspiring views of our beautiful planet below and zero-gravity passenger fun will bring a whole new meaning to in-flight entertainment.” 1


Click here to read more…A Glimpse into Aviation’s Possible Future?

The 5 Best Aviation Museums You Should Visit

Posted by on Jul 9, 2014

The 5 Best Aviation Museums You Should Visit

5 Best Aviation Museums You Should Visit | AIM

More than a hundred years after the Wright Brothers made their iconic first flight in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, we are still fascinated with the concept of aviation. Those two original brothers could not have conceived the impact their actions would have on an international scale–encompassing all aspects of society and forever changing the lives of billions of people in one form or another.

Barely a few decades after the original feat of conquering flight occurred, the airplane–as well as the men and women building and operating them–had evolved so dramatically in such a short period of time that it created what was, and is quite possibly still the largest explosion of technological advancement in recorded times. This means that although modern aviation cannot trace its roots back thousands of years like some other industries can, the incredibly quick progress in which the industry made–and continues to make–has left behind a rich and vibrant recorded history.


Click here to read more…The 5 Best Aviation Museums You Should Visit