Aviation Institute of Maintenance

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A Bright Future in Aviation

Posted by on Aug 30, 2016

Plane Takeoff

The Outlook.

We as the Aviation Institute of Maintenance train avionic technicians, but what kind of outlook do our graduates receive when they enter the workforce?

We open the door to a whole new vastly growing field. If you ever looked up into the sky as a child, and thought how those big jets stay in flight, we’re the ones keeping them going. Jets not only commute business class passengers or families for holidays, but they also are the lifeline for commercial transportation. How do you expect to get your wireless speakers off Amazon Prime in 2 days or less?

Starting a new career is a big decision, but we can show you the real numbers behind how much this field is growing, and how you can be a part of it.

The Numbers.

According to the 2016 Boeing Current Market Outlook , the amount of passenger traffic was up approximately 7.4% and capacity was up 6.7% in 2015 alone. In the end, that’s a record breaking 80% word wide. Because of lower gas prices, and varied aircraft efficiencies, airlines expected net profits of $35 billion dollars in 2015. Since then, key trends in aviation have skyrocketed and analysts expect to see this progression increase in the coming years.

Over the next 20 years in the field of aviation, Boeing has forecasted the industry will need approximately 39,620 new airplanes, valued at more than $5.9 trillion. With the diversity of the aviation field growing, new planes are needed to make up for the products and people being transported to more remote places. Most of the new traffic will be coming from Asia, The United States, Latin America, the Middle East and the Commonwealth of Independent States. The rise of single-aisle airplanes are the largest contributing factor in this growth.

The Growth.

With the globalized demand escalating tremendously who will build, repair, dispatch, and control all of these planes? YOU, that’s who! The demand is nearly tripling over the next 20 years for aircraft technicians, mechanics, air traffic control officers, and dispatch coordinators. In 2015 there were approximately 22,510 jet airplanes already in service, which is expected to nearly double to 45,240 aircraft by 2036. That means 39,620 new jets have to be manufactured, built, and transported.

Will you take this opportunity to request more information about this extremely expansive field?

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Aviation Institute of Maintenance Launches Free Online “Human Factors” Safety Course

Posted by on May 13, 2016

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) launched a free online course in Human Factors for aviation professionals, students, and enthusiasts around the globe. Understanding that 80% of all aviation-related incidents and injury occur because of human error, oversight, fatigue, and other human-related factors, AIM intends to combat such incidents by offering widespread instruction and guidance on minimizing risk. The school encourages students, professionals, and volunteers to enroll in this free continuing education course by visiting www.Aviation.edu.

Register for the free Human Factors Course Now!

In addition to the free Human Factors course, AIM has also made available an advanced online professional certification course entitled, “Minimizing the Risk of Incident and Injury due to Human Factors.” This certification course provides an in-depth understanding of the twelve most common human-related risk factors for aviation incidents, known as the “dirty dozen.” This course draws from the material in the introductory curriculum and allows the trainee to apply their knowledge and experience to numerous scenario-based situations in order to become more aware of accidents, why they happen, and how to avoid them. The instructor-led certification process carries a cost of $49 and awards graduates a certification from Aviation Institute of Maintenance.

Dr. Joel English, Vice President of Operations at AIM and author of Plugged In: Succeeding as an Online Learner, states that both the free introductory course and the full certification course are examples of innovative technologies and strong online teaching methods. “Our certification course doesn’t have the anonymous feel of a ‘MOOC,’ where the trainee wades through streams of information with no interaction. It’s situation based, there’s interaction with the instructor, and the assessments draw directly from the scenarios that the video lectures discuss.” The courses feature high definition video instruction, interaction with others in the course, and examples from authentic experiences that help the aviation professional think critically about safety in the workplace. English states, “AIM has always dedicated our instruction to awareness of the possibility for accidents or injury, and we found no reason to keep this innovative coursework to ourselves, when professionals around the industry could benefit.”

Aviation Institute of Maintenance is the United States’ largest family of aviation maintenance schools, with headquarters in Virginia Beach, Va. Students learn the skills necessary to become successful in one of the world’s fastest growing industries, aviation maintenance and the free Human Factors course and certification are examples of the school’s passion and commitment to the aviation industry. To see why Human Factors are important in the avionics industry, review the Role of Human Factors in the FAA.

Learn more at: www.Aviation.edu.

Aircraft Dispatcher History: An Evolution

Posted by on Dec 8, 2014

Dispatchers serve as one of the most crucial component to the entire airline operation. Aircraft dispatchers are licensed airmen, certified by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Dispatchers must undergo extensive testing and training to earn this highly sought after certificate, and must pass both an extensive oral examination and the comprehensive written Aircraft Dispatcher test. These tests are equivalent to the Air Transport Pilot (ATP) written and oral examinations that airline pilots take as part of their licensing procedure. They are, in essence, pilots on the ground, and are as legally liable for the aircraft as is the pilot in the cockpit.

Click here to read more…Aircraft Dispatcher History: An Evolution

A Glimpse into Aviation’s Possible Future?

Posted by on Nov 14, 2014

What will the aviation industry look like in 2030?  2040? You can bet it won’t be what we’re used to today.  Sir Richard Branson, president of Virgin Atlantic Airways, put it this way: “I have no doubt that during my lifetime we will be able to fly from London to Sydney in under two hours, with minimal environmental impact. The awe-inspiring views of our beautiful planet below and zero-gravity passenger fun will bring a whole new meaning to in-flight entertainment.” 1


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10 Pinterest Accounts to Follow About the Aviation Industry

Posted by on Jun 10, 2014

10 Pinterest Accounts to Follow About the Aviation Industry

10 Pinterest Accounts to Follow About the Aviation Industry | AIM

Anyone with ambitions to start a career in the aviation industry likely has a few questions about what exactly the job entails. Although the aviation business is still fairly young, a wealth of information is available on sites like Pinterest to help narrow the field. Everything from the profession’s earliest history, to famous planes and even the mechanical workings of current day planes are just a few of the subjects covered by aviation enthusiasts and professionals on Pinterest. The ten best Pinterest boards about aviation follow.


Click here to read more…10 Pinterest Accounts to Follow About the Aviation Industry