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What is an Aviation Maintenance Technician: A Career Description

Posted by on Oct 10, 2017

An aviation maintenance technician (AMT) career might suit you. However, here is what you need to know on job description, duties, education requirements, licensing requirements, salary & employment outlook:

What is an Aviation Maintenance Technician?

An aviation maintenance technician repairs and maintains all types of aircraft, such as planes and helicopters.

Duties

The duties of an AMT vary based on what company they work for. They can do anything from general maintenance to specialization in a specific area, like the airframe or powerplant. AMTs are required to diagnose issues, both mechanical and electrical, replace worn out or damaged parts and regularly inspect an aircraft on a maintenance schedule.

Educational Requirements

Aircraft maintenance schools offer programs you can complete in 18-24 months with hands-on training. The program’s curriculum should be approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). An AMT has to study a “general” set of subjects for at least 1900 hours for subjects relating to General, Airframe and Powerplant.

“General” curriculum studies examples: Electricity, weight and balance, technical drawings, pneumatics, corrosion control, maintenance manuals and federal regulations, especially regarding repair and modification procedures.

Airframe studies examples: Inspection, fasteners, structures (like wood, composite, and sheet metal), welding, assembly, rigging, finishes, atmosphere controls and hydraulics.

Powerplant studies examples: Inspection, engine theories and repair, instruments, electrical, ignition, and fire protection.

Obtaining a FAA Airframe and Powerplant Certification

General rules to be eligible for a mechanic certificate in the U.S.:

  • Be 18 years or older
  • Able to fluently read, speak, and understand English
  • Meet educational or experience requirements
  • Pass a set of oral and practical required tests within 24 months

Salary and Employment Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were 137,300 aviation maintenance jobs in 2014. BLS projects job outlook for holders of both Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certificate to be greater than only holding certification for one of the two. The annual mean wage pay for aviation maintenance technicians (mechanics) was $61,190 as of May 2016.

Brandon Hall Group Awards Aviation Institute of Maintenance and Fulcrum Labs 2017 Excellence in Learning Award

Posted by on Sep 13, 2017

The Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) and Fulcrum Labs have won this year’s Brandon Hall Group Silver award for excellence in the Best Results of a Learning Program category.

This award was presented to AIM and Fulcrum Labs for their Professional Aviation Maintenance learning program. The program was designed to prepare AIM learners to succeed within the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) aircraft mechanic certifications. The online test preparation course prepares AIM’s 3,500 active students, as well as countless military and civilian aircraft maintainers, for FAA certification. As a result of this program, AIM was able to improve its student pass rates from 79 percent to 90 percent.

 

“For aircraft mechanics, passing the FAA Aircraft Mechanic Certifications is a make-or-break situation. It takes intense time, confidence-building, and preparation to prepare for FAA certification, and the financial stakes for students is significant,” said Joel English, VP of Aviation Institute of Maintenance. “Leveraging the Fulcrum Labs technology to deliver this program has been great for our business, but more importantly, it has been incredibly impactful for our students, who now have greater confidence and a better chance of passing these critical exams.”

Fulcrum Labs is an adaptive, personalized learning technology that is designed to increase application of knowledge and turbocharge an existing LMS/HRMS to deliver quantifiable, verifiable mastery. This year’s honor marks Fulcrum Labs’ third Brandon Hall Group Award win.

“Excellence Award winners symbolize the power and impact that Human Capital Management practices can have on a business or on any organization,” said Rachel Cooke, Chief Operating Officer of Brandon Hall Group and head of the awards program. “Many organizations can have great HCM initiatives, but the standard of excellence only applies for organizations whose HCM practices truly benefit the business. That’s what the Excellence Awards program stands for, and that is what Brandon Hall Group stands for.”

The award entries were evaluated by a panel of independent senior industry experts, Brandon Hall Group analysts, and executives based upon the following criteria: fit the need, design of the program, functionality, innovation, and overall measureable benefits.

More information about the Brandon Hall Group and its Excellence in Learning Awards can be found at http://www.brandonhall.com/excellenceawards/.

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: http://www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

About Fulcrum Labs

Fulcrum Labs turns Students into Learners and Learners into Confident Subject Matter Masters. Learning shouldn’t be one-size-fits-all, like an old pair of sweatpants. We believe training should begin with personalization and engagement. It should build confidence and lead to mastery. And, it should provide insightful, actionable data to verify mastery; predict which employees might not be able to apply the training; and help evaluate and fine-tune the course. Our personalized, adaptive learning and predictive analytics (PALPA™) SaaS platform is a result of this philosophy. It replicates many of the benefits of a dedicated, one-on-one tutor. Through real-time performance and behavioral data, Fulcrum’s machine learning algorithms deliver the right content at the right time. The result: a combination of mastery and confidence. Employees are more engaged and capable of applying the training back to the workplace. Fulcrum’s customers have seen tremendous results in markets including commercial aviation, healthcare, manufacturing, certification prep and higher education. For more information on Fulcrum Labs, please visit: http://www.the-fulcrum.com/

About Brandon Hall Group

Brandon Hall Group is a HCM research and advisory services firm that provides insights around key performance areas, including Learning and Development, Talent Management, Leadership Development, Talent Acquisition and Workforce Management.

 

With more than 10,000 clients globally and 20 years of delivering world-class research and advisory services, Brandon Hall Group is focused on developing research that drives performance in emerging and large organizations, and provides strategic insights for executives and practitioners responsible for growth and business results. (www.brandonhall.com)

Lucky #13: 13 Aviation Maintenance Facts

Posted by on Sep 12, 2017

The world of aircraft maintenance is an expanding field to consider for your future career. There are countless opportunities for those equipped with the proper knowledge and their Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) certification. Listed below are a few facts about the field of aircraft maintenance:

  • Choose a part 147 school that is approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).
  • You can earn certificates of completion, an associate’s degree or a bachelor’s degree concentrating in aircraft maintenance.
  • Upon graduating from an FAA approved school, you are qualified to take the FAA certification exam.
  • Practice makes perfect. It is a strength to be detailed-oriented as an Aircraft Maintenance Technician (AMT). Double checking yourself and meeting strict deadlines helps to lower downtime in flight schedules and ensures the safety of the flight crew, passengers and AMTs.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the mean annual wage for aircraft mechanics and technicians in 2016 was $61,190.00 per year or an hourly pay of $29.42.
  • To operate properly and at their best, aircraft require reliable parts and examination. Mechanics use precision instruments, like x-rays, magnetic or ultrasonic equipment, to find problematic areas. If detected, AMTs assess the wear and tear on the aircraft in order to make the proper repairs.
  • The FAA has specific federal regulations requiring every aircraft to have a set schedule for maintenance, repairs and inspections, guaranteeing it is in the safest condition possible.
  • An Airframe and Powerplant certification enables AMTS to inspect, perform or supervise maintenance of commercial and private aircraft systems.
  • Mechanics who hold an Airframe and Powerplant certificate have more of a chance at landing a position in the aviation field than those who don’t.
  • The typical “office” for aviation mechanic is a hangars, repair station or airfield.
  • Mechanic’s hours are usually full time with need for overtime and weekend shifts.
  • Get experience under your belt to help you advance to lead mechanic, lead inspector or shop supervisor.
  • In 2016, the number of airplane departures was approximately 90 million. It’s estimated to double by 2020.

If you would like to join the aircraft mechanics field, a great way to start is by checking out Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s Aircraft Maintenance and Mechanics Training Programs.

Job Outlook: Aviation Maintenance Technician

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017

If you get thrilled by the thought of airplanes, there are numerous jobs out there for you. Over the recent years, there’s been a rise in the number of private planes, a high growth in the drone industry and increased profits in the airline industry. As a result, the entire aviation industry faces a shortage in the number of aircraft maintenance technicians.

What Aviation Maintenance Technicians Do

As an aviation maintenance technician, your duties are to check and troubleshoot aircraft equipment regularly, repair and replace parts that need attention, such as various components like: wheels, brakes, electrical systems and wings. Technicians are required to use diagnostic procedures that are approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

Job Outlook

Almost 130,000 aviation mechanics were employed in 2016 alone, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The BLS states that growth is expected to remain steady through to the year 2024. As air traffic is expected to rise over the next few years, more innovations are expected to take ground in the design and manufacturing of aircraft and that will require maintenance. Specialized work on aircraft is expected to be outsourced abroad and will be needed in domestic shops. This means that those who acquire specialized skills and keep honing their expertise can possible take advantage of these opportunities in the future.

Education Requirements

The minimum educational requirement for aircraft maintenance technicians is a certification from an FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school, such as Aviation Institute of Maintenance. If you previously attained some informal on-the-job training or acquired your skills during a military training, you are eligible to apply to a course like Professional Aviation Maintenance Certification. This training is a review of information designed to prepare you to successfully pass the General, Airframe and Powerplant written, oral and practical exams.

Salary Expectations

The mean annual wage for aviation maintenance technicians was reported as $61,190 in the year 2016, according to BLS. The lowest 10% of aviation maintenance technicians earned a salary of less than $35,960, while the highest 10% earned more than $87,880 annually. Aviation maintenance technicians typically work for eight hours a day, although sometimes overtime is expected. Many workers are usually affiliated with a workers union.

It can be a beneficial choice to join the aviation industry as an aviation maintenance technician. Begin a career now by joining on of the Aviation Institute of Maintenance’s  Aircraft Mechanic School Programs. Our school is committed to the education and personal enrichment of every student with a passion for the aviation maintenance profession.

AIM Indianapolis Career Fair Opens Doors for Its Attendees

Posted by on May 30, 2017

AIM Indianapolis Career Fair Opens Doors for Its Attendees

By Jul DeGeus

On May 11th, the Aviation Institute of Maintenance Indianapolis campus held its first Career Fair. The event was open to AIM students, alumni and the public and had a turnout of about 180 people. With ten on-site interviews and four additional scheduled, Career Service Coordinator and Career Fair organizer, Erica Wheeler, dubbed the turnout a hit:

Our first career fair was a huge success!  It was great to see all the people coming and going throughout the day.  All the employers in attendance expressed that they would definitely be present at another fair in the future.  I will be planning another for the fall and I know the turnout will be even better.

Over 15 employers came out to the campus looking for people to join their company. A full list of employers include:

  • FedEx Express
  • UPS
  • Airborne Maintenance & Engineering Services
  • The Home Depot
  • Ameriflight
  • GE Aviation
  • Fastenal
  • Republic Airlines
  • Praxair Surface Technologies
  • Launch Technical Workforce Solutions
  • AAR Corp
  • Aero Repair
  • Applied Composites Engineering
  • PSA Airlines
  • United Airlines
  • Gulfstream

PSA Airline recruiters talking to Career Fair attendees.

So, what is it that employers were looking for in prospective recruits? Predominately, they were looking to hire attendees with their Airframe and Powerplant Certification. There were also several opportunities for those who were willing to relocate and work flexible hours. According to Student Services Coordinator, Amber Delp, AIM Indy had many individuals who met these requirements and were thrilled to have the chance to interact with proposed employers:

It was so wonderful to see the excitement in the students’ faces. They were very grateful to have this networking opportunity. I was able to watch all my hard work leading up to this point unfold; my passion is to help our students, graduates and community get in contact with the right people to help them with their career and that’s exactly what we accomplished. I like knowing that this one event helped attendees to believe in themselves and inspired them to push for their own personal goals.

About Aviation Institute of Maintenance

Aviation Institute of Maintenance (AIM) is a network of aviation maintenance schools with campuses coast-to-coast across the United States and headquarters located in Virginia Beach, Va. AIM students are trained to meet the increasing global demands of commercial, cargo, corporate and private aviation employers. AIM graduates are eligible to take the FAA exams necessary to obtain their mechanic’s certificate with ratings in both Airframe and Powerplant. AIM’s campuses are located in the following major metro areas: Atlanta, Philadelphia, Dallas, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Washington, D.C., Kansas City, Mo., Oakland, Calif., Orlando, Fla., and Norfolk, Va. Learn more at: www.AviationMaintenance.edu.

AMT Day is May 24. Will there be a DMT Day?

Posted by on May 24, 2017

The FAA explores the future of Unmanned Aircraft Systems, or drones, and the possible need for Drone Maintenance Technicians.

By Jul DeGeus

For obvious reasons, we at the Aviation Institute of Maintenance are highly anticipating the celebration of Aviation Maintenance Technician Day on May 24th.

On May 24th in 1868, Charles Edward Taylor was born on a farm in Cerro Gordo, Illinois. He would one day work on engines for the infamous Wright Brothers and become known as the first aviation maintenance technician. (1)

In the latest issue of the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Briefing, assistant editor Jennifer Caron transports you back to the early 1900’s, when the three “crazy” men attempted to make a solid object fly; something that is normal to us today. She then snaps us back into to the present with one genius question: “… you’re an AMT, watching in amazement as drones become increasingly popular. Are YOU the next Charlie Taylor — for drones?” (2)

She’s got a great point- what is the potential outlook for the UAS industry and UAS maintenance technicians? Caron explains the background, demand and the promising opportunities:

The job potential and growth is real, and most believe the UAS industry will grow exponentially. Just consider companies that look to use drones for package delivery. Theoretically, they will need thousands of UAS to meet delivery deadlines not only in the U.S., but around the world…The possibilities are vast. As more and more companies identify and create the need for UAS, the need for UAS technicians will flourish as well. (2)

AIM’s Introduction to Unmanned Aircraft Systems training is a way for individuals to learn more about this evolving industry. It’s a two-day course offered at our Manassas, VA, Chesapeake VA, Atlanta – Metro GA, Dallas – Metro TX, Oakland CA, and Philadelphia PA campuses.

This article, “Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future?”, is a must read for those interested in UAS, as well as forward thinkers and innovators. Click here to read the article by Jennifer Caron, found on page 33.

Sources:

  1. Taylor, B. (n.d.). Charles E. Taylor: The Man Aviation History Almost Forgot. Retrieved from https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/fsdo/phl/local_more/media/CT%20Hist.pdf
  2. Caron, J. (2017, May & June). Drone Maintenance Technician: Aviation Job of the Future.FAA Safety Briefing, 33-34. doi:https://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2017/media/MayJun2017.pdf