How Much Does an Aircraft Mechanic Make?

How Much Does an Aircraft Mechanic Make?

Aircraft Mechanics are responsible for the safety of the crew and passengers as well as the successfulness of each aircraft flight.

How much does a aircraft mechanic make?  In order to answer this question, we have to look at a few contributing aspects.  Education level, experience, industry, type of work you perform, specialization and geographic location all play a role in what you can expect to make as a Aircraft Mechanic.  Training, certification, registrations and the type of industry appear to be vital determining factors in actual salary amounts (according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics – How to Become an Aircraft Mechanic page).

What is an Aircraft Mechanic?

The job of an Aircraft Mechanic is a very important one. They are responsible for the safety of the crew and passengers as well as the successfulness of each aircraft flight. Other duties typically include the replacing and repairing of aircraft parts, the diagnosis of mechanical and electrical problems, testing and staying up with performance standards while keeping record of the maintenance and repair work. Aircraft Mechanics typically work outside, in hangars, repair stations, airfields or for the federal government.

What is the Job Outlook for an Aircraft Mechanic?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, opportunities for aircraft mechanics will be easier to advance in when an A&P certificate is held. Knowledge of cutting edge technology and composite materials, computers and digital systems will also provide for better opportunities in the future.

How Much Does an Aircraft Mechanic Make?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics – Occupational and Employment Wages Webpage, Aircraft Mechanics median wage was $55,210.00 in May 2012. The top 10% of Aircraft Mechanics earned more than $76,660.00 and the bottom 10% earned less than $35,190.00.

For more information about a career in the aircraft mechanic field, or to speak with an admissions representative and apply for aviation career training, contact the Aviation Institute of Maintenance today by visiting our Aircraft Mechanic School Programs Webpage. You can also learn more about the Aviation Institute of Maintenance at our Consumer Information Disclosure page, Your right to know.

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SOURCES – Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2014-15 Edition, Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians, 
on the Internet at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/installation-maintenance-and-repair/aircraft-and-avionics-equipment-mechanics-and-technicians.htm (visited January 13, 2014).
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