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5 Signs You Work in the Aircraft Maintenance Industry

Posted by on Apr 17, 2014

5 Signs You Work in the Aircraft Maintenance Industry

5 Signs You Work in the Aircraft Maintenance Industry | AIM

Aircraft maintenance is a field of important and often physically demanding work that occurs around the clock every day of the year.  It is also a career with a great variety of opportunities to specialize in an area of mechanics that you will enjoy.  At the same time, at any moment of the day or night thousands of passengers will be flying through the air depending on the work that you do.  Here are 5 signs that you work in the varied and exciting aircraft maintenance industry.

1.  You Earn a Great Living!

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average pay for mechanics and technicians working on aviation and avionics equipment was over $55,000 per year, or about $26.55 per hour.  Your work as an airplane mechanic or technician is incredibly important for keeping the airline industry moving, and keeping passengers safe.  You are paid well because of this, and because of the skill and pride that you display in your work.

2.  You Enjoy Working Overtime

Your work as a mechanic or technician is never done, and there is always another project waiting when you are through with the work you do.  You are often asked to work overtime hours, and you enjoy the extra hours at even higher pay, knowing that you work while others rest.  The reward of a bigger paycheck and doing your best work under pressure makes this one of your favorite parts of your career.

3.  You Do Great Work in Any Conditions

All through the day you work in an environment that can be loud, dirty, and at the mercy of the weather.  You do not mind, and you enjoy knowing that your physical condition and training gives you the ability to do work that most people can’t.  Whether it is in the day or night, in a blizzard or a heat wave, you always take pride knowing that you are part of an elite group of professionals that can do the physically and mentally demanding work of this industry.

4.  You Meet the Strict Standards of the FAA

The Federal Aviation Administration of the US government makes sure that all mechanics and technicians meet a set of requirements that puts you in a group of highly qualified individuals.  While at first, it might look like it takes little more than speaking English and having a high school diploma, the reality is that you have spent a lot of time learning the aircraft maintenance industry.  Now you are an expert and have the opportunity to pass on your knowledge to apprentices in your shop.

5.  You are Dedicated to Always Learning More

While a lot of people think they have what it takes to become a well paid and professional aviation mechanic or technician, what sets you apart from those that do not cut it in the industry is your ability to always learn more.You took the time and money to invest in the proper training and apprenticeship for your career. You keep up to date with all of the latest in the industry, and keep your licenses and FAA certifications up to date. You also take the time to gain new certifications in your area of expertise. This ultimately earns you a very nice paycheck, putting you in the top ten percent of the field, with an annual salary over $75,000.

For more information about aircraft maintenance career training, the Aviation Institute of Maintenance Aircraft Mechanic School Programs is where you can learn more. Visit our Consumer Information Disclosure page, Gainful Employment Disclosure and Consumer Information, today.

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Disclaimer – Aviation Institute of Maintenance makes no claim, warranty or guarantee as to actual employability or earning potential to current, past or future students and graduates of any career training program we offer. The Aviation Institute of Maintenance website is published for informational purposes only. Every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of information contained within; however, no warranty of accuracy is made. No contractual rights, either expressed or implied, are created by its content. The printed Aviation Institute of Maintenance catalog remains the official publication of Aviation Institute of Maintenance. The Aviation Institute of Maintenance website links to other websites outside the aviationmaintenance.edu domain. These links are provided as a convenience and do not constitute an endorsement. Aviation Institute of Maintenance exercises no control over, and assumes no responsibility for, information that resides on servers outside the aviationmaintenance.edu domain.
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